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Thread: Light primer strike - CVA optima

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by rf2 View Post
    That's the set-up. I have the same thread locker you mention. Shock doesn't damage the thread locker on the scope screws because they are not being directly pounded on, and the screws are already tight. If the firing pin retainer is loose and I rely on thread locker to keep it tight, I believe the small amount of play that the thread locker is occupying will result in the eventual disintegration of the thread locker as the primer is pushed against the firing pin retainer over and over from the pressure in the barrel upon ignition.
    Also, the firing pin retainer is meant to be easily removed because the area needs to be cleaned frequently. If there's thread locker in there, the frequent removal and re-installation of the part will result in thread locker making it's way into the action. It would be almost impossible to effectively remove thread locker from the threads in the action.
    Seems like an interesting system.

    A replacement spring may do it, if that keeps tension on the threads, so you are actually working against the tension of the spring when screwing in the retainer then that should help hold it but it boggles the mind that tight is too far to allow the gun to fire. Too bad you do not have an extra set of these parts to compare them, something is just not the right size, either the firing pin is too short or the retainer is not the right length.

    Has this happened since day one with this gun?

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  3. #12
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    Which breech plug are you using, the BH209 or black powder? If you have a vernier caliper can you measure depth of primer hole.
    Experience is what you gain when you didn't get what you wanted.

    Many are called but only a few are chosen.

  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaycee View Post
    Is it possible that there may be a slight burr on one of the surfaces of the firing pin or the bushing that may interfere when you tighten it down.
    You may have to examine both carefully with a magnifying glass.
    Or another possibility is that the hole for the firing pin in the bushing is not concentric, or straight and the firing pin is binding when the bushing is tightened down.
    I'll check it out, but the strange thing is that the problem only started recently after relatively trouble-free service for several years.

  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fox View Post
    Seems like an interesting system.

    A replacement spring may do it, if that keeps tension on the threads, so you are actually working against the tension of the spring when screwing in the retainer then that should help hold it but it boggles the mind that tight is too far to allow the gun to fire. Too bad you do not have an extra set of these parts to compare them, something is just not the right size, either the firing pin is too short or the retainer is not the right length.

    Has this happened since day one with this gun?
    It's a recent problem. The cost to replace all 4 parts as a kit is apparently $13 USD, but they are out of stock for one of the parts, and they don't ship directly to Canadian customers.

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by tracker View Post
    Which breech plug are you using, the BH209 or black powder? If you have a vernier caliper can you measure depth of primer hole.
    I'm just using the standard one that came with the gun from the factory. I've tried 2 different types of primer, including CCI muzzleloader primers. Same result with both.

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by rf2 View Post
    It's a recent problem. The cost to replace all 4 parts as a kit is apparently $13 USD, but they are out of stock for one of the parts, and they don't ship directly to Canadian customers.
    One of the joys of the rarity of muzzle loaders in Ontario, I have been through this just trying to get setup too, need a spare part wait 2 weeks.

  8. #17
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    You need a CVA firing pin shim kit which is approx. $7-8 USD out of the states. It comes with several shims to bring your firing pin bushing flush with the breech face. This will allow the firing pin to extend further into the primer (as it did before the bushing loosened up) and should eliminate your light/failed strikes and will keep the bushing consistently flush with the breech face.

    If you have issues with blow-back from the primer as well (which I did as well as light strikes), this shim kit will also reduce the blow-back on the breech face and into the firing pin bushing - google is your friend as there are several suggestions on how much primer "crush" you may want to achieve. I'll throw the standard caution out that too much primer "crush" may result in unwanted ignition when closing the action, so make sure you know what you're doing and you're comfortable there! The primer "crush" shouldn't be necessary to eliminate your light strikes...

    I'm not aware of a Canadian source for these, so there may be an Ogdensburg run in your future...

  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by marx911 View Post
    You need a CVA firing pin shim kit which is approx. $7-8 USD out of the states. It comes with several shims to bring your firing pin bushing flush with the breech face. This will allow the firing pin to extend further into the primer (as it did before the bushing loosened up) and should eliminate your light/failed strikes and will keep the bushing consistently flush with the breech face.

    If you have issues with blow-back from the primer as well (which I did as well as light strikes), this shim kit will also reduce the blow-back on the breech face and into the firing pin bushing - google is your friend as there are several suggestions on how much primer "crush" you may want to achieve. I'll throw the standard caution out that too much primer "crush" may result in unwanted ignition when closing the action, so make sure you know what you're doing and you're comfortable there! The primer "crush" shouldn't be necessary to eliminate your light strikes...

    I'm not aware of a Canadian source for these, so there may be an Ogdensburg run in your future...
    Excellent input - thanks a lot!

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