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Thread: tracking collars

  1. #11
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    Why make tracking systems mandatory.

    Safety of the dogs.

    Safety of the general public and hunters.

    Respecting others property and respecting other hunters

    Respect for Game
    Last edited by swampsinger; September 1st, 2018 at 10:48 AM.

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by thunderbelly View Post
    I need more explaining, so far, I disagree with you, and think forcing someone to spend that much money on something that isn't necessary, doesn't make any sense.
    As far as applying to all service dogs, how would wearing a GPS tracking collar help a seeing eye dog ( or whatever the PC term is)? All the service dogs I see, are on leashes and under control of the owner. When I am hunting my dogs are under my control, but not on leashes. I use mini cow bells on my dogs ( left over from my beagle days) or an electronic beeper to keep in contact with them.
    I believe your intentions are good, but without reasons for a blanket statement like "Tracking collars and I.D. collars/tags should be mandatory for all hunting dogs. It should also be illegal to remove or disable these collars and tags. " I could never agree with you on this. Please, change my mind.
    In answer to your question, with no intent to change your mind, most service dogs are not on leash and roam in wilderness areas at all times of year to locate lost individuals or human remains. Service dogs are typically owned and paid for by the owners out of the owners pockets and take a lot of training to become certified to National standards. Making it mandatory may also require the team (not the owners) to provide the units, the cost of a GPS in this case is minimal considering the other costs involved.
    " Grant Mountain Bloodhounds Clementine Burgermeister TD, MiSAR"


  4. #13
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    I would say, most service dogs are cruising malls, and escorting their handlers through their daily routines. I think, ( because of your signature and statement) you are talking about service dogs that perform search and rescue. I don't know much about that area, I imagine there are some instances when the dog is off leash. While tracking, my dogs, are on long leashes, a practice I thought was common to most. While hunting birds, they are off leash, but within ear shot at all times,. While small game hunting, they are also close enough to hear the mini cowbell hanging from their collar. I don't allow them to chase deer, personal preference, but I suppose if I was to use them to track bear, I would have them on a gps system. When hunting coyotes, there is no need for a bell or tracking collar, all the action happens within sight.
    I have to agree with an earlier statement, if someone was to steal one of my dogs, having a gps collar on them, would just lead me to the place the acehole parked, and tossed my dog's collar. I am pretty sure, once he got my dog home, he would see the ID tag I have on their normal collars, realize his mistake, and call me right away.

  5. #14
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    Had my dog stolen, tracking collar discarded into a road side ditch about 3 miles away. Dog was ear tattooed, got him back 5 months later, still had my yard collar on, but name plate removed. Bad people will always do bad things.

  6. #15
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    The main benefit of using tracking systems is to prevent loss of Hounds. I can speak from personal experience. I started using a radio tracking system approximately 25 years ago, and since that day I have never come home without my treasured Beagles. The new gps systems have improved that benefit and can do a lot more. I believe its just part of being a responsible Hound owner. Most Hound owners that I know and associate with already have these units in use. Its quite common to attend a Beagle field trial with 70 or 80 Hounds entered and every single one of them is wearing a tracking collar.

    The first myth antis throw at us is we don't care about or value our Hounds and abandon them after the hunt. The public at large doesn't know the difference between myths like this and reality. I believe a mandatory program of tracking systems could create some goodwill and dispel some myths with the general public.

  7. #16
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    The only thing I wish the GPS collars had was the same type of shut off that the wildlife collars have, a magnet. The GPS collars are too easy to turn off. Had this happen a couple of years back . Collar was turned off where they left the property and the scum bag turned the dog loose some 20 clicks away. They also took his ID collar off. Got the dog back from the animal shelter in Bancroft, but never found the GPS collar.
    SkyBlue Big Game Blueticks

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by swampsinger View Post
    The first myth antis throw at us is we don't care about or value our Hounds and abandon them after the hunt. The public at large doesn't know the difference between myths like this and reality. I believe a mandatory program of tracking systems could create some goodwill and dispel some myths with the general public.
    Not a hounds man however believe tracking collars is an added insurance for the well being of the dogs. However making it mandatory isn't the option Easy enough for them too say see they need to be legislated to protect their pooch.
    Educating hunter on the benefits of use and eliminating barriers to using it the answer.
    Time in the outdoors is never wasted

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