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Thread: Upland Dog For an Old Fat Dude

  1. #21
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    I got a Britt because I didn't want to chase a flushing dog. I have found that I was certainly wrong. I can keep her close as I want but it is a pain in the butt for both of us and I really like watching her run big. Turns out I just chase after points rather than flushes. Good times and it worked out for both of us. I'm fitter and she's faster.

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  3. #22
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    Have you researched the Wire-haired Pointing Griffon? bigger set dog that typically works at a mild rate. I have a 9 month puppy that weighs 75 pounds that operates at a great walking pace.


  4. #23
    Borderline Spammer

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    I love my britt but she is neither slow nor close working. She'll hold point for as long as it takes for me to get to her. With an ecollar and a beeper she's never out of ear-shot.
    A bad day hunting is still better than a good day at work!
    40 year member of OFAH

  5. #24
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    Time in the outdoors is never wasted

  6. #25
    Getting the hang of it

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    I have had over 45 years experience with Springers and they are a wonderful breed. However, as with any breed there is tremendous variation between individual dogs nature and training. If you select a calm pup from a breeding of relaxed tempered parents you may do just fine. It sound like I am in the same position as you at 60+ I was not looking for a slower dog but rather a dog I could walk slower with. I got a working cocker and am delighted with him. I have corresponded with Cass before and know mine's temperament is different from his dog. His description is accurate for many of the breed but mine is more relaxed than his. I do spend a fair bit of time training but range has never been an issue that needed work with my boy. He is naturally very busy and active but always well within gun range. Even if I stop and stand still he just busily works cover all round me usually less than 30 yards away. They are not for everyone they can be high energy and mischievous little fellows but I would recommend you take a look at a couple before you make a final decision.

    If you really want to just poke along, a Lab (but not from field trial breeding) will walk with you and nose around in the bushes and pick up your birds. They are probably the easiest breed to train just not stylish or flashy in the way they work.
    Last edited by singlemalt; November 6th, 2018 at 04:30 PM.

  7. #26
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    [QUOTE=singlemalt;1072211]I have had over 45 years experience with Springers and they are a wonderful breed. However, as with any breed there is tremendous variation between individual dogs nature and training. If you select a calm pup from a breeding of relaxed tempered parents you may do just fine. It sound like I am in the same position as you at 60+ I was not looking for a slower dog but rather a dog I could walk slower with. I got a working cocker and am delighted with him. I have corresponded with Cass before and know mine's temperament is different from his dog. His description is accurate for many of the breed but mine is more relaxed than his. I do spend a fair bit of time training but range has never been an issue that needed work with my boy. He is naturally very busy and active but always well within gun range. Even if I stop and stand still he just busily works cover all round me usually less than 30 yards away. They are not for everyone they can be high energy and mischievous little fellows but I would recommend you take a look at a couple before you make a final decision.

    Good advice certainly about looking at a few dogs prior to making a choice. I have seen too many who made decisions on breed descriptions etc rather than looking at the actual dogs.

    I would add however from my experience over similar years that field trial bred labs perform very well for the foot hunter. I have had several field champions who believed they were 'vacuum cleaners' in the field. Worked close with style and with great accuracy/performance in the field.

    The biggest issue I see is regardless of the breed, many , many hunters expect a dog to go out and perform at a certain level. What they seem to always forget is the fact that they haven't spent time training their dog to perform the tasks in the manner desired. As for the field trial breeding, I believe you benefit not only from the health perspective but from the grey mass...sheer intelligence.

    You want them close then train them to your expectation.

  8. #27
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    pointing dogs are easier to train
    get what you like - hunting style, temperament, looks
    make sure the breeder pays attention to breeding healthy dogs
    some people like common breed and they are cheaper, some people like rare/exotic ones
    I used to have spaniels, I prefer pointing dogs now.
    "The dog is Small Munsterlander, the gun is Beretta."
    "You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed" A. Saint-Exupery.

  9. #28
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    [QUOTE=krakadawn;1072236]
    Quote Originally Posted by singlemalt View Post
    I have had over 45 years experience with Springers and they are a wonderful breed. However, as with any breed there is tremendous variation between individual dogs nature and training. If you select a calm pup from a breeding of relaxed tempered parents you may do just fine. It sound like I am in the same position as you at 60+ I was not looking for a slower dog but rather a dog I could walk slower with. I got a working cocker and am delighted with him. I have corresponded with Cass before and know mine's temperament is different from his dog. His description is accurate for many of the breed but mine is more relaxed than his. I do spend a fair bit of time training but range has never been an issue that needed work with my boy. He is naturally very busy and active but always well within gun range. Even if I stop and stand still he just busily works cover all round me usually less than 30 yards away. They are not for everyone they can be high energy and mischievous little fellows but I would recommend you take a look at a couple before you make a final decision.

    [COLOR="#FF8C00"]Good advice certainly about looking at a few dogs prior to making a choice. I have seen too many who made decisions on breed descriptions etc rather than looking at the actual dogs.



    I would add however from my experience over similar years that field trial bred labs perform very well for the foot hunter. I have had several field champions who believed they were 'vacuum cleaners' in the field. Worked close with style and with great accuracy/performance in the field.

    The biggest issue I see is regardless of the breed, many , many hunters expect a dog to go out and perform at a certain level. What they seem to always forget is the fact that they haven't spent time training their dog to perform the tasks in the manner desired. As for the field trial breeding, I believe you benefit not only from the health perspective but from the grey mass...sheer intelligence.

    You want them close then train them to your expectation.
    So true. See the parents , go to an event and see dogs work .
    " We are more than our gender, skin color, class, sexuality or age; we are unlimited potential, and can not be defined by one label." quote A. Bartlett


  10. #29
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    Lot's of good advice. I'm not in a hurry so I'll keep researching and searching. TC

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