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Thread: Hunter Shot in Norfolk

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fox View Post
    Well, so far there was 1 person shot in a controlled hunt this year, I have not heard of any others.

    Last year 1 person shot himself with a crossbow bolt near Kingston, not a controlled hunt.

    2016 a man near Bobcaygeon was killed, not a controlled hunt.

    2015 a man shot himself with a loaded shotgun climbing into a tree stand, not a controlled hunt.

    I would love to see Welsh's fact sheet.

    Another reason why hunters are their worst enemy.
    Well, we had a heck of a week in 2013 i remember. And that was just the November week
    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottaw...gins-1.2417094
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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by LowbanksArcher View Post
    Well, we had a heck of a week in 2013 i remember. And that was just the November week
    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottaw...gins-1.2417094
    Ya, that was a bad year, I do not believe any of them were during the controlled hunt.

  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jack View Post
    I struggle with this statement.

    Of course I agree with being safe and knowing your backstop but you can be as careful as you wish and still have a ricochet.

    There is inherent risk in this activity.

    Your bullet can go much further than you can see and in a direction that was unintended.
    There is an inherent risk, is it not surprising then that there are so few accidents in Ontario and a pile of these accidents are self inflicted, stupid things like climbing up a tree stand with a loaded firearm or pulling up a loaded rifle on a rope, stupid things that do not even involve an animal.

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by fieldtrip View Post
    I don't know if they were driving deer but that's why I hate that type of hunting. Guys pushing deer to someone at the other end has to many possibilities for disaster.
    Agreed!

  6. #25
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    sometimes I scratch my head on these forums, we outdoorsmen are our own worst enemy. Statistically hunting is safer then bowling. I am willing to bet there is higher odds I get hurt or killed driving to work then hunting.personally I like to hunt from a portable stand solo and don't care for driving deer, but I will not accuse them of being unsafe or look down on anyone pushing a bush or saying its a recipe for disaster..relax guys, lets wait to see what details emerge from this Norfolk case and use this as another reminder to be safe, law abiding hunters out there...we already have enough anti's lobbying to get rid of our sport so lets not give them any more ammo...just a thought!

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by trimmer21 View Post
    Just a quick Google check shows less than 50 hunting accidents across Canada in 2017 and only 6 in Ontario. No indication of stats for controlled hunts. . Welsh is blowing smoke.
    Whether one form of hunting is inherently more dangerous than another has nothing to do with the total number of incidents.

    While we're talking about blowing smoke.

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  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by kokes View Post
    ...we already have enough anti's lobbying to get rid of our sport so lets not give them any more ammo...just a thought!
    The best way to stop giving them ammo is to stop having accidents.

    And the best way to stop having accidents, as any workplace safety expert will remind you, is to stop denying or minimizing risk.

    The hunting community needs to have frank discussions about accidents.

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  9. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by trimmer21 View Post
    Just a quick Google check shows less than 50 hunting accidents across Canada in 2017 and only 6 in Ontario. No indication of stats for controlled hunts. . Welsh is blowing smoke.
    I think you mean "reported accidents" so I think I will safely assume there are more.The controlled hunt by its very nature in many parts of the Province with big gangs pushing small bush, in more populated area,s lend,s itself to this being a unsafer hunt IMHO.

  10. #29
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    Sorry, for ve been sitting on this statement all day. Totally disagree that itís not the fault of the shooter. I have to ask who is at fault then? If itís your round, you own it until it stops. Plain and simple. If you didnít know your back ground.....you still own it.

  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaycee View Post
    Thank You , for explaining my thought line.
    There are too many that will quickly pull the trigger without thinking of the possible circumstances, of what, where, and why things can happen.
    I have been around guys like that they can be very scary,and I stay away from them.
    I still dont get what that has to do with the legality of which deer they can shoot.

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