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Thread: New Shooter/Hunter

  1. #1
    Just starting out

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    Default New Shooter/Hunter

    Hey everyone, just got my Pal and hunting liscence. I'm conflicted on what rifle to purchase for a first time! You hear so many things from so many people .

    I'm looking to hunting large game , any rifles you would recommend that are in the $800.00 range? Personal expierence is best !

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  3. #2
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    Many new hunters are influenced by those around him/her as they hear stories first-hand and may get to handle firearms. So your first stop would be check in with friends or family members who own firearms. We can go on ad-nauseum about calibers, but the truth is you can’t go wrong with a 7mm, .270, .308, or 30.06. As far as make and model goes, you usually get what you pay for and $800 can get a middle of the road rifle. You might be able to get a better quality rifle in your price range if you buy a used one. It doesn’t hurt to haggle or shop around. Some smaller gun shops may have older inventories and may be willing to knock a few bucks off to get rid of one. There are different actions to consider with bolt action being most popular. Nothing wrong with a Remington pump (i owned one and filled many tags with it) or lever action. I would recommend that you avoid a semi auto. I currently used an old Browning single shot, which is more appropriate for guys that have been there and done that and aren’t hung up on filling their tags.

    At the end of the day, you want a rifle that shoulders well, grips well, looks good, isn’t too heavy, shoots well, easy to clean, and is dependable. You also want a rifle with a light and crisp trigger pull.

    You may want to think about how long that you intend to keep it for. Some hunters love to collect guns and hardly sell, while others buy and sell and eventually end up with their dream gun that they keep forever.

    If you are intent on buying new, then consider a savage bolt action with the adjustable trigger. Savage is known for accurate rifles.

    If you don’t mind a used rifle, consider a Tikka, Rugger, Browning, or an older Winchester model 70.

    Good luck!
    Last edited by Sam Menard; December 4th, 2018 at 06:50 PM.

  4. #3
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    I would start with a .22. Learn good shooting techniques with that before stepping up to high power centrefire.

    Sent from my SM-G925W8 using Tapatalk

  5. #4
    Getting the hang of it

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    Quote Originally Posted by rippin_355 View Post
    I would start with a .22. Learn good shooting techniques with that before stepping up to high power centrefire.

    Sent from my SM-G925W8 using Tapatalk
    ^This^ If you have never shot a rifle before, shooting a rim fire will help you with technique, has very little recoil, not to mention the ammo is easy on the wallet. And fun to shoot!

    For hunting, you can shoot small game (Rabbit, grouse, squirrel, etc) with rim fire and it helps with aim.

    You can buy rim fire rifles for cheap if you want, or go on the pricier side.

    If you have shot a rifle before, as mentioned, consider what you will be hunting (and where you will be hunting) this in turn will help you decide what calibre rifle you should get. Also on that note, consider the availability of the ammo.

    I find a good rule: whatever rifle you buy and for how much, buy at least the same price in glass (Scope) So if your budget is $800 get a rifle for $400 and scope for $400. Now you can push the rifle price up a bit (maybe $400-700) and still be ok with a $400 scope.

    Some entry level rifles come with a scope, but they are not the best quality. Nothing worse than shooting at an animal and injuring, all because your scope is crap, and did not function well to match the environmental conditions you were hunting in.

    Make sure you shoulder the gun and it "feels good": if you have friends, ask them to shoot their guns, take them out to the range (on you) and shoot a few rounds. This will give you an idea of what brands or rifle you may want. Used is also an option. With bolt action rifles, most have probably not seen that many rounds down range. Maybe sighting it in, and a few seasons (maybe 5-10 rounds shot). With Semi-Auto, you can get some that have been shot with a lot of rounds.

    My 2 cents.

    W.
    Last edited by Badbuzz; December 5th, 2018 at 12:06 PM.

  6. #5
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    The savage Axis 2 line is available in most calibers used in Ontario, for Ontario game.
    IF you have a plan to hunt in an area check to see what caliber restriction are in your area. No sense buying a .308 if restrictions are for .270 or less, or a shotgun only restriction.
    Next consider the cost of ammo (if this will be a problem for the budget shooter), common caliber such as .223, .308, 30-06 are cheaper to shoot then say .300 or .270 caliber
    Find a range that has space to for you to join ($$$$), pretty crowded down that way in TO to find a club that has openings for new members.
    Next get out and shoot often, to learn your gun, sight it in, and become so effective that pulling the trigger is natural.
    Consider how often you will shoot the rifle. (only once during a big game season?)
    Then consider if a shotgun might offer you more versatility overall and a better first time investment.
    Many shotguns come with 3 barrel options, a duck barrel, a turkey barrel and rifled Deer slug barrel, and they can be bought within your budget.
    A shotgun, can also cover all your small game needs and could be very versatile for your area.
    Don't forget to check used gun sites, Gun Nuts, MEWE, this forum, sometimes you can get a good deal on used gun, maybe two for your budget.
    Don't forget about a gun safe, or where you will store the gun once bought.

    Welcome to the forum and new journey!!!
    Mark Snow, Libertarian Nepean, for 2019, Chairman - Ontario Libertarian Party

  7. #6
    Leads by example

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    I tell new shooters to buy a 22 as well as a big game rifle but have them in the same action such as bolt or leaver. Bolt actions are more dependable in my opinion as you tend to take your time aiming for accuracy before you jack another in the chamber. As said already, you cant go wrong with the savage line very good out of the box . For your 800 dollars you could probably get a savage axis in 308 or 306 as well as the savage 22. I know you can probably get the cheap scope with the axis if you decide to go this route get a cheap one for the 22. personally I like to see new shooters learn and practice with iron sights first then work up to scopes, they can be broken in the bush Good luck in the future and practice lots with the 22 what ever you get. All the best Don
    Never resent growing old, Many do not get the chance.

  8. #7
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    I have 3 Savage Axis's and they are my go to guns for large game and coyote (2 X .223 in Axis 1 and 2 and Axis 2 in .308)
    Mark Snow, Libertarian Nepean, for 2019, Chairman - Ontario Libertarian Party

  9. #8
    Just starting out

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    Wow ! Thanks for the replies ! I see the hunting forum is alot more welcoming than the fishing forum I joined years ago ! Lol

    @ Sam Menard

    Personally I was thinking
    .270 ,but of course this is just word of mouth and from all I've read so far.

    I wish my budget could be higher but at the time being it is what it is, besides I figure I'll eventually want another firearm . Most likely a shotgun, leaning towards 10gauge .

    The other problem I have with buying used is my inexperience, I dont want to be hustled into a lemon . haha

    Doubt I'll sell any !! Lol thanks for your input !!

    @ rippin_355

    My only problem is that the .22s are so light they feel like toys . Atleast the ruger 10/22 I held. I do agree with starting small, but I'm a big boy and I think I can handle more than a .22!! I hope !! Lol

    @ bad buzz

    I think starting with small game really is my best option, cheaper on the wallet and a bit more exciting *so I've read * lol

    The biggest shock to me when I first started looking into hunting was the price of scopes, completely threw me off gaurd. But like everything in life , you get what you pay for.

    Again, I'm have zero to no real expierence with guns. Which is why I think for the time being I will stay away from used.

    Thanks for your reply !

    @line052

    I've checked and I will be going with .270 if my mind hasn't changed to a shotgun or .22 .

    There is a place in St. Catts, roughly 45min - 1 hour. No big deal as I love leaving all the chaos behind lol. They have ample space and accept alot of new members each year, I already have money set aside for the membership.

    Almost every experienced shooter/hunter I've spoken too has suggest a shotgun. I dont know , theres just something with the rifle I've always liked and is leaning me that way. But I may have to have a change of heart!! Ohhh the problems !!! Haha I thought fishing was bad..

    Thanks for the reply ! Appreciate it !

    @Severn don

    Most people I've spoken too have told me to stay away from savage, but I havent really given them a chance. I'll definitely look into them ASAP !

    Thanks everyone ! To be honest you didn't help!! But made my decision even harder hahaha.. I guess I'll have to just get my self into the store, See which fit best and go from there.

  10. #9
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    Unless you plan on going to the range at least 15 times a year, you may as well just pay a "day pass fee" Some ranges have them for 20 bucks a day...Silverdale in St. Anns is one. They are located South East of Hamilton.......................Daniel

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by severn don View Post
    I tell new shooters to buy a 22 as well as a big game rifle but have them in the same action such as bolt or leaver. Bolt actions are more dependable in my opinion as you tend to take your time aiming for accuracy before you jack another in the chamber. As said already, you cant go wrong with the savage line very good out of the box . For your 800 dollars you could probably get a savage axis in 308 or 306 as well as the savage 22. I know you can probably get the cheap scope with the axis if you decide to go this route get a cheap one for the 22. personally I like to see new shooters learn and practice with iron sights first then work up to scopes, they can be broken in the bush Good luck in the future and practice lots with the 22 what ever you get. All the best Don
    .22 and centre-fire rifles in the same action is a good idea. use the same sights (open/peep/scope) on both.
    I'd agree with Don's comment on learning with irons first. I've been shooting for 40+ years and have only recently started using a scope.

    Re: the 10ga - I'd stay away from that. 12's provide all the power you need. I do see some use in the 12 3", but wouldn't bother with the 3 1/2.

    Re: the .22 being like toys - they usually are smaller because there is no need to make them bigger. I have a marline 39a and its only a bit smaller/lighter than a m94. The best way to get good at shooting is to shoot a lot. When I was younger I used to shoot hundreds of rounds of .22 a day. With a .270 that would be hard on both the shoulder and the wallet.
    Last edited by werner.reiche; December 5th, 2018 at 03:28 PM.

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