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Thread: Coyotes maybe not as devastating as we think?

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    Default Coyotes maybe not as devastating as we think?

    Meateater Article on coyotes and their effect on deer populations

    https://www.themeateater.com/conserv...not-deer-herds

    it's not going to stop me from trying to take a couple out this winter or any chance i get but it seems a few studies aren't showing that coyotes are devastating to deer alone.
    A Hunt Based Only On Trophies Taken Falls Far Short Of What The Ultimate Goal Should Be - Fred Bear

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    That's an American article by Patrick Durkin - He's an author for d&dh and abh. I think he lives in Winsconsin. He's talking about the smaller "pure" coyotes they have south of the border, not the big ones in central and eastern Ontario. They coyotes up here take deer all year - not just fawns. Many of the coyotes up here are wolf-hybrids. As far away as Maine, its 30% hybrid. Likely over 50% in Ontario.

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    It's an American article, with Canadian data. As seen in this thread: https://www.oodmag.com/community/sho...Not-Deer-Herds

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    Quote Originally Posted by werner.reiche View Post
    That's an American article by Patrick Durkin - He's an author for d&dh and abh. I think he lives in Winsconsin. He's talking about the smaller "pure" coyotes they have south of the border, not the big ones in central and eastern Ontario. They coyotes up here take deer all year - not just fawns. Many of the coyotes up here are wolf-hybrids. As far away as Maine, its 30% hybrid. Likely over 50% in Ontario.
    it is just stupid to be calling what we have here in Ontario and out eastward to the Maritime Provinces a coyote . They are a "SMALLISH" wolf.
    Take the warning labels off. Darwin will solve the problem.

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    Quote Originally Posted by awndray View Post
    It's an American article, with Canadian data. As seen in this thread: https://www.oodmag.com/community/sho...Not-Deer-Herds
    Not seeing Canadian data. A reference to Trent University study of moose kills by coyotes.
    Actually - its for the most part an opinion article - not too much hard information.
    Did you read it before you posted the link?

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    I have never kidded myself that I could impact the overall coyote population, but I will shoot a coyote when I see one, to protect our dogs. During our deer hunt this past fall in the North Bay area, we had coyotes following our dogs and doggers. They were definitely coyotes, which surprised me as I expected wolves or crossbreeds.

    Coyotes/wolves are very intelligent and are averse to danger. I will not hesitate to remind any coyotes/wolves around that when we are doing a push, they need to go the other way for their own good. I have no intention of letting my beagle get eaten.
    Last edited by ninepointer; December 17th, 2018 at 01:02 PM.
    "What calm deer hunter's heart has not skipped a beat when the stillness of a cold November morning is broken by the echoes of hounds tonguing yonder?"

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    Quote Originally Posted by werner.reiche View Post
    That's an American article by Patrick Durkin - He's an author for d&dh and abh. I think he lives in Winsconsin. He's talking about the smaller "pure" coyotes they have south of the border, not the big ones in central and eastern Ontario. They coyotes up here take deer all year - not just fawns. Many of the coyotes up here are wolf-hybrids. As far away as Maine, its 30% hybrid. Likely over 50% in Ontario.
    In Ontario, they are called Algonquin wolves, if you want to be politically correct.

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    Quote Originally Posted by werner.reiche View Post
    Not seeing Canadian data. A reference to Trent University study of moose kills by coyotes.
    Actually - its for the most part an opinion article - not too much hard information.
    Did you read it before you posted the link?
    Perhaps you missed the part where they referenced the Trent U and MNRF research and continued by explaining the research. The article then went on with the quote from a U Georgia professor. So yeah, I read it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by awndray View Post
    Perhaps you missed the part where they referenced the Trent U and MNRF research and continued by explaining the research. The article then went on with the quote from a U Georgia professor. So yeah, I read it.
    This research - about moose? Moose are *not* deer. So, yeah I'm thinking you didn't read it.

    The headline of the article is completely misleading "Coyotes Kill Deer, Not Deer Herds" - the article is a poorly put together bunch of references to studies - none of which supports the assertion put forth by the title.

    The moose study reference -
    "No one should question the coyote’s hunting skills. They can also kill adult deer. In fact, Ontario researchers John Benson of Trent University and Brent Peterson of the Ministry of Natural Resources documented four different coyote packs killing moose in central Ontario during the 2008 and 2009 winters.
    Evidence at the kill scenes verified these were hunts, take-downs and fresh-meat feasts; not mere carcass scavenging. In fact, the researchers documented five other likely coyote-on-moose kills, but evidence couldn’t verify the predator. Benson and Peterson cleared wolves as the culprits, given kill-scene evidence and an alibi: Wolves are rare in the study area."
    Last edited by werner.reiche; December 17th, 2018 at 03:26 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thunderbelly View Post
    In Ontario, they are called Algonquin wolves, if you want to be politically correct.
    Algonquin Wolf re-naming is pure,politically correct,leftist-liberal,academic bullshyte. Call them whatever they want,when I see 'em,I shoot 'em.

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