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Thread: NY coyote-hunting contest; $2,000 prize.

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    Default NY coyote-hunting contest; $2,000 prize.

    This just sounds like a great idea all round..great fun and a worthwhile cause ....we need to do things like this here in Ontario..

    WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, N.Y. -- The 12th Annual Coyote Hunt, open to hunters across the state along with five counties in Pennsylvania, is scheduled for Feb. 8-10 with a $2,000 grand prize being offered for the heaviest coyote.

    The three- day contest is being sponsored by the Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs of Sullivan County. Coyotes can be taken by hunting or trapping. The hunter/trapper who makes the kill must be present at the competition's weigh-ins, scheduled from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Feb. 8-9 and from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 10.

    Eligible coyotes must be taken during the three-day contest in New York or the Pennsylvania counties of Pike, Susquehanna, Wayne, Lackawanna and Monroe. They can be killed either by shooting or trapping them, day or night. All other New York State hunting regulations apply.

    The weigh-ins will be held at the White Sulphur Springs Fire House on Route 52 in Sullivan County. According to the contest regulations: “We suggest all coyotes be brought in on the day of the kill for weigh-in.”

    “If taken after weigh-in hours keep coyote warm. All coyotes will be body temperature tested. A temperature above lOO degrees or below 68 degrees is a disqualification. Use whatever means necessary to keep the body temp above 68 degrees. Wrap the coyote in bags, tarps, blankets or put in Ice chests & don't expose the coyote to the elements before weigh-in.”

    The rules are a guard against a contestant entering a coyote taken outside of the tournament dates.

    Last year, a total of 611 hunters participated and a total of 61 coyotes were taken during the three-day event. The biggest coyote – a 51.10-pound male -- was turned in by Kevin Burgher from Olive Branch, N,Y. hunting in Ulster county. He earned $2,000 for the grand prize, and an additional $200 for the heaviest coyote taken on Saturday during the contest.

    As in years past, on the last day, a banquet and gun raffle will be offered this year from 1 to 3 p.m. Feb. 10.

    Along with the $2,000 grand prize, other cash awards this year will include $500 for the second heaviest coyote and $250 for the third heaviest coyote weighed. In addition, there will be a $200 prize for the heaviest coyote weighed each day; $100 to a heaviest coyote turned in by a youth hunter (ages 12-15) and $100 to the heaviest coyote turned in by a female hunter. Finally, $80 will be awarded for all other coyotes weighed in during the 3-day hunt.

    A $35 early entry fee ($45 after Jan. 25) will cover the three days of the hunt, plus the dinner Sunday and a free $5 gun raffle ticket to be drawn at the dinner. Banquet only is $25.

    Proceeds from the coyote hunt go toward a wide variety of Federation's activities, including paying for fishing derbies and sending youngsters to the state Department of Environmental Conservation's summer camp.
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

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    Let me know when you set it up.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Mike Pal, slaughtering wildlife for a prize, and viewing it as being fun might raise some ethical questions. For instance, wouldn’t it kind of rate right up there with trophy hunting, which I don’t have a problem with but others might? Are there provisions being made for the coyotes to be skinned and the pelts marketed or does that lot fall to the individual hunters? I’m sure the deer herd would profit from a few less coyotes to nibble away at it, but is it in line with sound management and conservation practices? Just a couple things to give some thought to. No offence intended.

    You don’t stop hunting because you grow old. You grow old because you stop hunting.
    - Gun Nut.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gun Nut View Post
    Mike Pal, slaughtering wildlife for a prize, and viewing it as being fun might raise some ethical questions. For instance, wouldn’t it kind of rate right up there with trophy hunting, which I don’t have a problem with but others might? Are there provisions being made for the coyotes to be skinned and the pelts marketed or does that lot fall to the individual hunters? I’m sure the deer herd would profit from a few less coyotes to nibble away at it, but is it in line with sound management and conservation practices? Just a couple things to give some thought to. No offence intended.

    You don’t stop hunting because you grow old. You grow old because you stop hunting.
    - Gun Nut.
    You have seen all the big buck contests have you not?

    Mike, they used to have one of these out of Osgood, I think it ended because of bleeding hearts, maybe all the city cats being eaten will change some views.

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    Coyote Hunters, on the Niagara Peninsula have been harassed to no end by peta groups , these instances have made the news several times.
    The hunters were doing every thing legally but they were harassed to the point where both the MNRF and the police were involved.
    Myself, I do not want to hunt that ay by having a hunting contest advertised, and having all the crackpots turn out and harass all the hunters involved.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gun Nut View Post
    Mike Pal, slaughtering wildlife for a prize, and viewing it as being fun might raise some ethical questions.
    From an agricultural/livestock point of view Coyotes are vermin and need to be eradicated and the MNRF has directed an open season in many WMU's (for that reason). It's not 'Hunting', its killing them.

    The people who don't understand that, don't have the right to cast aspersions on those that shoot them for sport. Doing it as a registered 'cull' with, incentives for participation, benefits both the farming community, the MNRF and the sportsman who undertake the task.

    But you're right there is always the social conscience types that find offense, concern themselves with the ethics etc. but in the end it's because they don't understand sound management and conservation practices.....until a coyote takes Fluffy away from them when they are out for a walk
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

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    Quote Originally Posted by MikePal View Post
    From an agricultural/livestock point of view Coyotes are vermin and need to be eradicated and the MNRF has directed an open season in many WMU's (for that reason). It's not 'Hunting', its killing them.

    The people who don't understand that, don't have the right to cast aspersions on those that shoot them for sport. Doing it as a registered 'cull' with, incentives for participation, benefits both the farming community, the MNRF and the sportsman who undertake the task.

    But you're right there is always the social conscience types that find offense, concern themselves with the ethics etc. but in the end it's because they don't understand sound management and conservation practices.....until a coyote takes Fluffy away from them when they are out for a walk
    That's what happened around our neighborhood. The bunny-hugger's yaps shut tighter than clams.

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    From an agricultural/livestock point of view Coyotes are vermin and need to be eradicated and the MNRF has directed an open season in many WMU's (for that reason). It's not 'Hunting', its killing them.

    The people who don't understand that, don't have the right to cast aspersions on those that shoot them for sport. Doing it as a registered 'cull' with, incentives for participation, benefits both the farming community, the MNRF and the sportsman who undertake the task.
    Not every one in the farming community wants all coyotes killed.
    In over 43 years of hunting coyotes, very successfully, both by running hounds, mine and friends, also by calling, we have run into several farmers [orchardists ] , that have asked us /told us that they would prefer to have the coyotes left alone as they were/are the best rodent eliminators [rats/mice and rabbits ] around.
    They claim that without the coyotes being around and eliminating the rodents, there is a lot of damage done in the orchards by they rabbits/mice and rats whereby they girdle the trees and eventually they die, that is a lot of hard work,money and profits lost, after all this is their lively hood.
    They also claim that deer do a lot of damage by nibbling of new growth in their orchards and with coyotes around they stay away .

    Our daughter says she can verify these claims by orchardists as she has a business in inspecting orchards and sees the amount of damage done.
    Last edited by jaycee; January 21st, 2019 at 05:26 PM.

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    Every Farmer I know around here have issues with Yotes.

    However wasn't there some contest around here a few years ago an a bunch of anti's freaked out. Things have quieted down by the anti's since peoples dogs starting disappearing/
    "This is about unenforceable registration of weapons that violates the rights of people to own firearms."—Premier Ralph Klein (Alberta)Calgary Herald, 1998 October 9 (November 1, 1942 – March 29, 2013)

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    Now the contests are just more discreet lol the one around here is $800 for heaviest coyote shot that weekend.

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