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Thread: Indiana may list Grouse as endangered!

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    Default Indiana may list Grouse as endangered!







    INDIANA MAY LIST GROUSE AS ENDANGERED

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    Curtis Niedermier

    According to Steve Backs, a wildlife-research biologist with the Indiana Division of Fish and Wildlife, public misperception about responsible timber management is a big reason why ruffed grouse habitat has disappeared from Indiana in recent decades—and why population decline as a result of habitat loss is the main reason that the Indiana Nongame Bird Technical Advisory Committee issued a proposal last summer to move the ruffed grouse from the State List of Species of Special Concern to the State Endangered Species List. At press time the change was up for review by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR).
    Unfortunately, listing grouse as endangered in Indiana seems warranted. According to Backs, the state’s grouse population is estimated at less than 1 percent of what it was 40 years ago, and in 2018 not a single grouse was heard drumming during spring roadside counts for the sixth consecutive year. Grouse hunting in Indiana was suspended in 2015.
    “To put that into perspective,” Backs said, “in the early ’80s we were harvesting over 10,000 birds a year. We were also trapping and trading grouse for wild turkeys and helping other states with their restoration of ruffed grouse.”
    Backs has been sounding the call to manage timber resources for habitat diversity for more than 20 years, but he says modern land-use practices, public policy and social trends with regard to harvesting timber have been major hurdles. The potential listing could bring needed publicity to the issue and light a fire under wildlife managers and influencers in other nearby states where the bird is cruising toward a similar fate. It also would provide additional legal protection in the Hoosier State.
    “By moving [grouse] to state endangered, any proposed state construction, public-service projects or timber management on public land will have to include some type of environmental review as to whether the proposed project will possibly negatively impact ruffed grouse populations or create or enhance habitat for ruffed grouse,” Backs said.
    The Ruffed Grouse Society recently issued a public letter with a call to action regarding the proposed Indiana listing.

    Hopefully this does not happen here in Ontario!
    Last edited by jaycee; March 15th, 2019 at 11:32 AM.

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    We did that with our Bobwhite quail.
    Time in the outdoors is never wasted

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    Theres a lot more undisturbed bush in Northern ON then Indiana. I dont see Timber practice hurting grouse here.

    Southern and central ON, who knows, but the vastness of Northern ON hides a lot of birds, and very little people.

    Now, climate change might effect them, but thats a different discussion.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blasted_saber View Post
    Theres a lot more undisturbed bush in Northern ON then Indiana. I dont see Timber practice hurting grouse here.

    Southern and central ON, who knows, but the vastness of Northern ON hides a lot of birds, and very little people.

    Now, climate change might effect them, but thats a different discussion.
    Well said, they been doing very well and even flourished ever since we started logging over a hundred years ago. I don't think you can compare the two habitat and the logging practice.
    "When you piss in the wind, you will get your feet wet."
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    Quote Originally Posted by blasted_saber View Post
    Theres a lot more undisturbed bush in Northern ON then Indiana. I dont see Timber practice hurting grouse here.

    Southern and central ON, who knows, but the vastness of Northern ON hides a lot of birds, and very little people.

    Now, climate change might effect them, but thats a different discussion.
    Quote Originally Posted by Deer Hunter View Post
    Well said, they been doing very well and even flourished ever since we started logging over a hundred years ago. I don't think you can compare the two habitat and the logging practice.
    The problem here in the southern part there is no to minimal logging. The birds do best in successional forest and now we have to many mature forest left untouched.
    Time in the outdoors is never wasted

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    Quote Originally Posted by finsfurfeathers View Post
    The problem here in the southern part there is no to minimal logging. The birds do best in successional forest and now we have to many mature forest left untouched.
    And for that reason (among others) they probably arent ever going to recover in the true south.

    I think the decline in central ON has been caused by the changing forestry practice, but I doubt they ever get bad enough they are wiped out. My grandfather tells me what things were like in the '40s and '50s when he was growing up Parry Sound Distrcit, and the bird population is significantly reduced. The forestry practice has changed considerably here in that time too.

    I also think the size of Ontario and the relative low # of hunters will play a factor here too, especially in the north. Theres probably more hunters in Indiana then Ontario, for instance, with a significantly smaller area to hunt.

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