Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 38

Thread: Farmer near Perth wants Wolf/Coyote Hunters

  1. #21
    Member for Life

    User Info Menu

    Default

    IMO,the only food we should be feeding Coyotes is lead (or copper whichever you prefer) at high speed.
    I like my firearms like Liberals like voters-----undocumented.

    Proud supporter of OFAH,CCFR,NRA,A.F.& A.M. and Shriners Children's Hospitals.

  2. # ADS
    Advertisement
    ADVERTISEMENT
     

  3. #22
    Member for Life

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trimmer21 View Post
    IMO,the only food we should be feeding Coyotes is lead (or copper whichever you prefer) at high speed.
    Soft lead at relatively slower speed is also effective, 1000fps is enough

  4. #23
    Member for Life

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fox View Post
    now you have to pay for it.
    Still a heck of a lot cheaper then the fines for illegal dumping of deadstock. Manure piles are a big No-NO...
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

  5. #24
    Member for Life

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MikePal View Post
    Still a heck of a lot cheaper then the fines for illegal dumping of deadstock. Manure piles are a big No-NO...
    They have to get caught first, and in most cases of anything( SSS for example) people do when they should not they never think they will.

    Makes a moral conflict for hunters. Do you report a dead cow/sheep on a farm where you are only by the grace of the owner, or do you look the other way.

    I know guys out west that would buy old horses and dairy cows. Take them up the mountain and shoot them for Grizzly bait. Fred Bear did it on video with a old pack mule.

    Not sure it's still legal out west, or if a hunter could buy a live cow/horse and shoot it out in the woods here in Ontario. How much different would that be then cutting up a dead cow and making a meat-cicle for a coyote stand. Probably a subject for a different thread.
    Take the warning labels off. Darwin will solve the problem.

  6. #25
    Member for Life

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwalker View Post

    Makes a moral conflict for hunters. Do you report a dead cow/sheep on a farm where you are only by the grace of the owner, or do you look the other way.
    So you're asking if it's OK to look the other way and take advantage of something illegal if it's in your best interest as a hunter...?
    Last edited by MikePal; March 20th, 2019 at 05:25 AM.
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

  7. #26
    Member for Life

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MikePal View Post
    Still a heck of a lot cheaper then the fines for illegal dumping of deadstock. Manure piles are a big No-NO...
    There are actually a pile of ways you can legally dispose of dead stock on a farm.

    http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/...ock/index.html

  8. #27
    Member for Life

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MikePal View Post
    So you're asking if it's OK to look the other way and take advantage of something illegal if it's in your best interest as a hunter...?
    Just pointing out the conflict. Not saying to or asking if it's ok.

    There is also the question, did the farmer dump the animal there or does he know an animal is missing and just has not found and retrieved it yet?

    Then as fox has pointed out, is the Farmer maybe Composting the dead stock.
    Last edited by Snowwalker; March 20th, 2019 at 09:18 AM.
    Take the warning labels off. Darwin will solve the problem.

  9. #28
    Member for Life

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fox View Post
    There are actually a pile of ways you can legally dispose of dead stock on a farm.

    http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/...ock/index.html
    Many not practical and darn hard to be in compliance....once you've tried, you see that $100 the guy wants to come pick up your deadstock...is well worth it.

    Example for compost:


    Clear snow from the compost site and the area where substrate materials will be temporarily piled. Use a non-swine neighbour's tractor to prevent contamination of other delivery vehicles.
    Bring in small square bales, shavings, hay or other substrates and warm solid non-swine manure to the site prior to bringing deadstock or tracking barn contaminants to the site. Bedding pack manure from beef or dairy is best as it will stay warm from breaking down and composting, even in the cold.
    Create a 3 m X 3 m (10 ft. X 10 ft.) foot box with square bales.
    Lay down a 30 - 60 cm (1 - 2 ft.) deep base layer of substrate (shavings, hay etc.).
    Bring unfrozen deadstock to the site. Lay piglet carcasses so they are not touching. Larger animal carcasses should be 30 cm (1 ft.) apart from each other. Keep carcasses at least 20 cm (9 ins.) away from the edge.
    Add manure or silage on top of the carcasses to initiate pile heating. If the carcasses are frozen and it's freezing outside, add up to 15 cm (6 ins.) of warm solid manure to get the compost heating.
    Put down another 15 cm (6 ins.) layer of substrate, and add more piglet carcasses. Use thicker substrate layers (up to 30 cm (1 ft.)) if carcasses are larger. Continue until the pile is 1.5 - 2 m (4-6 ft.) high and cone-shaped.
    Cover the completed pile with an additional 60 cm (2 ft.) of substrate.
    One of these piles requires about 6 - 8 cubic meters (8 - 10 cubic yards) of substrate. Generally, using more substrate is better than using less.
    As an estimate, use about 1.5 - 2 cubic meters (2-3 cubic yards) of substrate for each 1000 kg (2000 lbs.) of piglet deadstock.
    Monitor the compost pile for scavengers. If digging is evident, re-cover dug up spots with substrate. Use large square bales or stack the walls higher to reduce scavenger access.
    As an alternative, construct the compost pile inside a heated and ventilated farm building, if only dealing with a small amount of mortalities. Monitor indoor piles regularly for over-heating.
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

  10. #29
    Member for Life

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwalker View Post
    Then as fox has pointed out, is the Farmer maybe Composting the dead stock.
    Not likely if you see the above post...

    We used to have access to a private Quarry...we had guys who used to commute to work call us when they saw road killed deer. We'd go out and pick them up (service to the community ) and dump then in the quarry. Then sit up on the ridge and hunt over them for a week or so.
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

  11. #30
    Member for Life

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MikePal View Post
    Many not practical and darn hard to be in compliance....once you've tried, you see that $100 the guy wants to come pick up your deadstock...is well worth it.

    Example for compost:


    Clear snow from the compost site and the area where substrate materials will be temporarily piled. Use a non-swine neighbour's tractor to prevent contamination of other delivery vehicles.
    Bring in small square bales, shavings, hay or other substrates and warm solid non-swine manure to the site prior to bringing deadstock or tracking barn contaminants to the site. Bedding pack manure from beef or dairy is best as it will stay warm from breaking down and composting, even in the cold.
    Create a 3 m X 3 m (10 ft. X 10 ft.) foot box with square bales.
    Lay down a 30 - 60 cm (1 - 2 ft.) deep base layer of substrate (shavings, hay etc.).
    Bring unfrozen deadstock to the site. Lay piglet carcasses so they are not touching. Larger animal carcasses should be 30 cm (1 ft.) apart from each other. Keep carcasses at least 20 cm (9 ins.) away from the edge.
    Add manure or silage on top of the carcasses to initiate pile heating. If the carcasses are frozen and it's freezing outside, add up to 15 cm (6 ins.) of warm solid manure to get the compost heating.
    Put down another 15 cm (6 ins.) layer of substrate, and add more piglet carcasses. Use thicker substrate layers (up to 30 cm (1 ft.)) if carcasses are larger. Continue until the pile is 1.5 - 2 m (4-6 ft.) high and cone-shaped.
    Cover the completed pile with an additional 60 cm (2 ft.) of substrate.
    One of these piles requires about 6 - 8 cubic meters (8 - 10 cubic yards) of substrate. Generally, using more substrate is better than using less.
    As an estimate, use about 1.5 - 2 cubic meters (2-3 cubic yards) of substrate for each 1000 kg (2000 lbs.) of piglet deadstock.
    Monitor the compost pile for scavengers. If digging is evident, re-cover dug up spots with substrate. Use large square bales or stack the walls higher to reduce scavenger access.
    As an alternative, construct the compost pile inside a heated and ventilated farm building, if only dealing with a small amount of mortalities. Monitor indoor piles regularly for over-heating.
    Ya, I wonder who would ever go out and charge a farmer? I have watched bucket loads of pigs bring dumped over and over again at farms, they just have a pile there, it is visible from the main road.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •