Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: How to shoot a ruffed grouse

  1. #1
    Has too much time on their hands

    User Info Menu

    "What calm deer hunter's heart has not skipped a beat when the stillness of a cold November morning is broken by the echoes of hounds tonguing yonder?"

  2. # ADS
    Advertisement
    ADVERTISEMENT
     

  3. #2
    Member for Life

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Very educational video . Thanks.
    " We are more than our gender, skin color, class, sexuality or age; we are unlimited potential, and can not be defined by one label." quote

  4. #3
    Needs a new keyboard

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Thanks for posting
    "Give a man a fish and he eats for a day, Teach a man to fish and he eats for the rest of his life"

  5. #4
    Has too much time on their hands

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Good info for the guy working a flusher or 2 guys working a pointer otherwise being at the ready will make for tired arms by the end of the day.
    For me I find grouse tend to be a technically easier shot than woodcock. Grouse seem to fly in straight lines so going away shots are easy however crossing shots can be harder as often you don't have the swing room to line the bird up. Woodcock are a tougher shot until you get them figured out. I find most rush the shot. When they take off they tend to zigzag up than level off. If you rush the shot you'll run out of shells before they present a straighter shot.
    Time in the outdoors is never wasted

  6. #5
    Has too much time on their hands

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by finsfurfeathers View Post
    Good info for the guy working a flusher or 2 guys working a pointer otherwise being at the ready will make for tired arms by the end of the day.
    For me I find grouse tend to be a technically easier shot than woodcock. Grouse seem to fly in straight lines so going away shots are easy however crossing shots can be harder as often you don't have the swing room to line the bird up. Woodcock are a tougher shot until you get them figured out. I find most rush the shot. When they take off they tend to zigzag up than level off. If you rush the shot you'll run out of shells before they present a straighter shot.
    In my case, my game pocket shows its opposite for me. I think its mostly because the Evil Southern Grouse in my area to to flush 20-30 yards, before my dog or I even get near them.

    One tip that has worked well for me is to keep two hands on the gun as much as possible, meaning that I part a lot of brush with my elbows.
    "What calm deer hunter's heart has not skipped a beat when the stillness of a cold November morning is broken by the echoes of hounds tonguing yonder?"

  7. #6
    Has too much time on their hands

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ninepointer View Post
    In my case, my game pocket shows its opposite for me. I think its mostly because the Evil Southern Grouse in my area to to flush 20-30 yards, before my dog or I even get near them.

    One tip that has worked well for me is to keep two hands on the gun as much as possible, meaning that I part a lot of brush with my elbows.
    Don't get me wrong grouse are no easy to shoot its just the shot is easier to predict. If I get a straight away shot line it up and even if its about to disappear through cover you can predictably guesstimate that the bird will travel true. Pull the trigger and send the dog in. If it returns with the bird you got it. Granted its not a shot to take if you are dogless. Crossing shots are tougher as swing trough is cut short by trees so end up lining up the bird with the gun low and try and poke through openings.
    Time in the outdoors is never wasted

  8. #7
    Getting the hang of it

    User Info Menu

    Default

    I watched this video a couple of years ago on YouTube when I was trying to improve my method. I actually followed the advice given, I don't hunt with a dog, but when I approach an edge of cover I will often hold my gun as described before I walk through. That's actually one of the reasons I switched to a lightweight 20 gauge semi instead of my 12 gauge waterfowl gun it's a lot easier on the arms. Switching the safety off was part of practicing my mount for shooting trap.

  9. #8
    Just starting out

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Great points about using the safety. When I guided it was the same way. Nothing made me more nervous than when I heard that "click" prematurely.
    I'm going to add this video if I may to the discussion. It's a video on the Churchill method of shooting. Very interesting stuff for hunters.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •