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Thread: Bullet wobble

  1. #1
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    Default Bullet wobble

    Hi guys!

    In one of the threads someone mentioned bullet wobble ,and that it tames after 100 yard.
    Interesting topic.
    Could someone tell me more about this,"anything"is new to me,I am not quite familiar with this phenomenon.
    Mostly interested in 243,30-06 and 20 g sabot.......

    Thank You

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  3. #2
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    This topic could go on and on, go to "google " you will find lots of answers there on the subject.

  4. #3
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    Not the most helpful reply.

    There is no obligation to reply to my question!
    Last edited by gbk; July 20th, 2019 at 01:39 PM.

  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by gbk View Post
    Not the most helpful reply.

    There is no obligation to reply to my question!
    There is more info on "google " , from experts in the business, than we could possibly give here, without spending hours typing.
    Sorry I thought I was being very helpful.
    Last edited by jaycee; July 20th, 2019 at 02:14 PM.

  6. #5
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    There is a yaw shown in Lyman Reloading Handbook 45th Edition. The yaw imparted to the bullet during the spinning around the axis of flight may be caused by excessive velocity or the wrong combination of twist to bullet length. Bullets that yaw in this manner in early flight sometime settles down and spin true as they lose velocity.

    They use the term yaw I called it wobble. A bullet when it leave the muzzle may not stabilize immediately, there are a number of factors that can cause this to happen the illustration mention a few. Eventually they usually stabilize and fly true. The distance it take this to happen can vary from gun to gun and possibly from one bullet design to another. I mention my .303 British it seem to take about 100 yards with the bullet I was using to stabilized. At one point I was loading a cast spiral tip with the recommended Unique load of powder. The bullet was key-holing at 25 yards. I switch to a reduced powder charge of IMR 4895 and it stop the bullet from key-holing. The general accept idea is they put rifling in the bore in order to spin the bullet which off-sets the influence of gravity. What I discovered was spin has another variable which is velocity. The speed that the bullet travels through the rifling determines its rpms. If the rpms are not adequate the bullet will not stabilize and will end up tumbling, If its rpms are a bit high it will yaw, but as the bullet slows in flight it generally stabilizes. Im not a ballistic expert, so there maybe other factors involved.

    You dont stop hunting because you grow old. You grow old because you stop hunting.
    - Gun Nut
    Last edited by Gun Nut; July 20th, 2019 at 04:51 PM.

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gun Nut View Post
    There is a yaw shown in Lyman Reloading Handbook 45th Edition. The yaw imparted to the bullet during the spinning around the axis of flight may be caused by excessive velocity or the wrong combination of twist to bullet length. Bullets that yaw in this manner in early flight sometime settles down and spin true as they lose velocity.

    They use the term “yaw” I called it wobble. A bullet when it leave the muzzle may not stabilize immediately, there are a number of factors that can cause this to happen the illustration mention a few. Eventually they usually stabilize and fly true. The distance it take this to happen can vary from gun to gun and possibly from one bullet design to another. I mention my .303 British it seem to take about 100 yards with the bullet I was using to stabilized. At one point I was loading a cast spiral tip with the recommended Unique load of powder. The bullet was key-holing at 25 yards. I switch to a reduced powder charge of IMR 4895 and it stop the bullet from key-holing. The general accept idea is they put rifling in the bore in order to spin the bullet which off-sets the influence of gravity. What I discovered was spin has another variable which is velocity. The speed that the bullet travels through the rifling determines its rpms. If the rpms are not adequate the bullet will not stabilize and will end up tumbling, If its rpms are a bit high it will yaw, but as the bullet slows in flight it generally stabilizes. I’m not a ballistic expert, so there maybe other factors involved.

    You don’t stop hunting because you grow old. You grow old because you stop hunting.
    - Gun Nut
    That was very interesting Gun Nut, Thanks!

    TS

  8. #7
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    Thank You Gun Nut.

    We learn every day something new.Appreciate your reply.

    Almost comparable (the way i see this)as shooting bow with non matching arrow.
    IE-wrong spine.

  9. #8
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    I also think this explanation is right on, it's too bad that I was not able to find any exact data about the preferred rifling rate, speed, bullet weight, etc. in order to avoid this issue

    In fact, when I was recently intending to buy some Hornady SST bullets for my .30-06 handloads, the salesperson recommended Interlock Round Nose ones instead, suggesting the same "wobble" issue happening with the high speed SST's at shorter ranges (I was planning to try my handloads at 100 meters). So I went ahead and did buy (and load) some of those RN's - with satisfactory results at the range.

    Then - just out of curiosity, I decided to buy some SST's (somewhere else...) anyway, and loaded them up with Superformance powder, according to the Hornady reloading book's data.

    To my greatest surprise, the results were outstanding with my plane jane Savage 111 XP... Never before had I managed to shoot like these. (I have typed it so far when I realized that I had some difficulties before attaching photos. Hopefully it will work now...)

    Anyway, it's a really interesting topic.

    LasShot.jpg

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    Some good shooting Connie2002.
    Interesting input.
    Thanx

  11. #10
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    A damaged barrel crown can also affect accuracy and impart bullet wobble. As for the term yaw it makes sense but I've always seen it used in aircraft, meaning rotation around the vertical axis.

    Cheers
    Last edited by smitty55; July 20th, 2019 at 08:11 PM.
    Smitty

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