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Thread: Misdialed 911 call leads RCMP to home with 100 unsecured guns

  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by rick_iles View Post
    I have not seen an interior door lock yet that was difficult to break into.
    Had this discussion with a friend...he wanted to spend a fortune on a metal door with remote controlled electric locks etc etc...

    I said if I wanted to get into that room....I'd take two steps sideways and punch a hole through the Gyproc wall beside the door... a hand saw will get you in in minutes
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

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  3. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by rick_iles View Post
    I have not seen an interior door lock yet that was difficult to break into.....you may think that meets the requirement, but I can tell you it will not, should you have an issue..but you conduct yourself as you see fit.
    Quote Originally Posted by MikePal View Post
    Had this discussion with a friend...he wanted to spend a fortune on a metal door with remote controlled electric locks etc etc...

    I said if I wanted to get into that room....I'd take two steps sideways and punch a hole through the Gyproc wall beside the door... a hand saw will get you in in minutes
    Yeah, that was what i was driving at essentially. You take your chances letting the courts decide whether your storage room is "hard" to break into.

    Most hinge pins I've removed can be done with just fingers. Certainly not hard.
    You're only as good as your first shot of the day. Know your limitations and make it count.
    ...FC 2012

  4. #103
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    My guess is, the officers laid the charge because the homeowner wasn't able to show "where" he stores the 100 guns. Be it, not enough trigger locks, not large enough safe or both.
    You're only as good as your first shot of the day. Know your limitations and make it count.
    ...FC 2012

  5. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by onelessarrow View Post
    My guess is, the officers laid the charge because the homeowner wasn't able to show "where" he stores the 100 guns. Be it, not enough trigger locks, not large enough safe or both.
    I agree , see my post 58.

  6. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by onelessarrow View Post
    Yeah, that was what i was driving at essentially. You take your chances letting the courts decide whether your storage room is "hard" to break into.

    Most hinge pins I've removed can be done with just fingers. Certainly not hard.
    I would guess the courts would take into consideration, some 'attempt', to 'secure' them , rather than laying on the bed, or standing in the unlocked closet. I would think any lock between someone without a key and the trigger would do.

  7. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fox View Post
    The pins do not need to be on the inside, if they need a tool to get into the room (screwdriver) then you have met the requirements.

    The safety requirements have nothing to do with theft, they have everything to do with slowing someone unauthorized to access the firearms, mainly kids.

    The $5000 gun safes can be broken into with cordless tools, they just take a little less time than a hollow core door.
    Not sure about what is considered hard to break into but you are correct about this. I could get into any gun safe/vault sold by Cabelas/Bass Pro etc in under 10 minutes and in most cases under 5 minutes and that's without any practice. You would have to drop 30K+ on a UL listed Inkas or better and even than 45 minutes would do it. Short of a bank vault or dropping major coin - easy peasy. This would all be with tools that are on my truck every day of the week. Doesn't matter if the safe is lagged to concrete or even encased in concrete. If it has a door it can be opened and usually a lot easier than most people think. That being said it might cost me a couple diamond blades and/or some acetylene and little work with a pry bar. We regularly cut 7/8 and 1 inch diameter bolts on pipe flanges in literally 15 seconds - 20V commercial cordless grinder with a diamond cutoff wheel. Get to a jobsite and they can't find the key - not a problem, cables, padlocks, hardened bolts - doesn't matter - grinder removes them in seconds. If the battery goes dead or the bolt is too large the 14 inch Stihl takes care of it. Or if I want to save wear on a blade than pre-heat the bolt to 1200F+ and it cuts like butter.

    The typical gun safe/vault likely does prevent crimes of opportunity as compared to a typical man door. Drug addict doing a smash and grab could likely open a locked man door but would probably not have the tools for a cheap safe (under 5K). Targeted break in however and you are likely screwed no matter how you are storing them.
    Last edited by Species8472; August 13th, 2019 at 08:19 PM.
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  8. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by Species8472 View Post
    Not sure about what is considered hard to break into but you are correct about this. I could get into any gun safe/vault sold by Cabelas/Bass Pro etc in under 10 minutes and in most cases under 5 minutes and that's without any practice. You would have to drop 30K+ on a UL listed Inkas or better and even than 45 minutes would do it. Short of a bank vault or dropping major coin - easy peasy. This would all be with tools that are on my truck every day of the week. Doesn't matter if the safe is lagged to concrete or even encased in concrete. If it has a door it can be opened and usually a lot easier than most people think. That being said it might cost me a couple diamond blades and/or some acetylene and little work with a pry bar. We regularly cut 7/8 and 1 inch diameter bolts on pipe flanges in literally 15 seconds - 20V commercial cordless grinder with a diamond cutoff wheel. Get to a jobsite and they can't find the key - not a problem, cables, padlocks, hardened bolts - doesn't matter - grinder removes them in seconds. If the battery goes dead or the bolt is too large the 14 inch Stihl takes care of it. Or if I want to save wear on a blade than pre-heat the bolt to 1200F+ and it cuts like butter.

    The typical gun safe/vault likely does prevent crimes of opportunity as compared to a typical man door. Drug addict doing a smash and grab could likely open a locked man door but would probably not have the tools for a cheap safe (under 5K). Targeted break in however and you are likely screwed no matter how you are storing them.
    All correct - which is why out of site out of mind is one of the best practices. Gun safe in the basement bedroom closet is nice and concealed. And no advertising my hobbies with nifty Browning stickers on the truck.
    Lest we forget : I came to Ottawa with the firm belief that the only people in Canada that should own firearms are the Military and the Police..." Alan Rock Liberal Justice Minister 1995

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