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Thread: New Hunter

  1. #1
    Just starting out

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    Default New Hunter

    Hey guys, I've been interested in starting hunting for a long time but work never co operated with the necessary courses to get my PAL and hunter safety, until now. I'm only interested in hunting small game, grouse and rabbits mostly and gradually work up to larger game. Now I have very little friends that hunt so I'm learning on my own which is fine by me, but when it comes to choosing the proper firearm I'm a little lost. I would like 1 gun that is able to hunt grouse and rabbit. I've been considering either a .410 or a 12 gauge. I've been leaning to the 12 being that the ammo is considerably cheaper, and I could eventually use it to hunt larger game as well. But would it be too much? I don't want to blow them to pieces I want to eat them . I'm okay with going into the stores and asking questions but I don't want the guy to think I'm completely lost and try to take advantage of that either. What do you use? Gauge/choke/shot?

    Sent from my SM-N960W using Tapatalk

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  3. #2
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    A 410 is an experts gun, get the 12ga, get one that you can buy accessories for and you will be able to hunt anything with it.

    A Remington 870, Mossberg 500, both good guns with different barrels for hunting everything from doves to moose.

  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by DataPak420 View Post
    l. But would it be too much? I don't want to blow them to pieces I want to eat them .

    Sent from my SM-N960W using Tapatalk
    This is a common misconception of a lot of new hunters. Have hunted woodcock for most of my life with a 12 gauge. Aside from one (that's a story for another time) have not blown them up. Range and choke will determine how many pellets will be in the game.
    Hard to say what will work for you. Are up North where rabbits and grouse are more likely to hold still? Are you down south where game is a little more skittish and running/flying shots are expected?
    .410 would work but your error of margin is small, ammo is relatively expensive, and pretty much limited to upland. 12 would be your do all gun guess the only disadvantage is weight. Which gets more noticeable the older you get. Pushing bush all day arms can get tired. Might want to consider a 20 gauge as its the smallest gauge that you can hunt most every thing while keeping weight down.
    So to answer your question.
    Winter snowshoes .22
    Turkey 12 gauge browning full choke 3"
    Waterfowl 12 gauge browning choke switched to improved cyl or mod 3" depending
    pheasant 12 gauge browning 2 3/4" choke switched to improved cycl
    woodcock 20 gauge weatherby in youth model 2 3/4" improved cyl (the weatherby is 3" capable if I wish to use for any of the above with the appropriate choke
    Time in the outdoors is never wasted

  5. #4
    Has all the answers

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    Ever consider a 22lr for rabbits and grouse?

  6. #5
    Just starting out

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    There is so much which could be written here on the topic, but I'll keep it very simple and not rob you of the forthcoming enjoyment of discovery over the next fifty years. Asking a question such as this will derive as many different responses as you are physically capable of reading.
    Anyway, whichever gun you choose by far the most important thing you can do for yourself is to learn your gun, how it performs and its limitations. As a new shooter, you will also be burdened with having to learn the mechanics of how to shoot and your limitations as a shooter. The thing to remember is you can't do one properly without the other.
    As you progress over the years, the opinions you have gained will likely change as you continue to grow into the sport.
    All that being said, yes likely a versatile 12 gauge pump is not a bad place to start as long as you keep to standard 1 1/8 oz #6 and #7 1/2 loads in a skeet to modified choke. One of the biggest mistakes I see new shooters make is over gunning themselves unnecessarily when learning how to shoot. You don't need big uncomfortable loads to hunt small game with. Remember that wild turkeys were made extinct here in Ontario with 2 1/2" shells.
    One of the beauties of the lighter gauges and a .410 is they are a pleasure to shoot. That's actually the gun I taught my son to shoot with because it fit him very well, and didn't kick the heck out of his shoulder. He could comfortably learn shooting technique without flinching and has since developed into a very proficient wing shot. He's better than I am now but you didn't hear me say that.
    It's all about striking a balance when learning.
    Last edited by Jeff Kavanagh; August 14th, 2019 at 09:00 AM.

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by DataPak420 View Post
    Hey guys, I've been interested in starting hunting for a long time but work never co operated with the necessary courses to get my PAL and hunter safety, until now. I'm only interested in hunting small game, grouse and rabbits mostly and gradually work up to larger game. Now I have very little friends that hunt so I'm learning on my own which is fine by me, but when it comes to choosing the proper firearm I'm a little lost. I would like 1 gun that is able to hunt grouse and rabbit. I've been considering either a .410 or a 12 gauge. I've been leaning to the 12 being that the ammo is considerably cheaper, and I could eventually use it to hunt larger game as well. But would it be too much? I don't want to blow them to pieces I want to eat them . I'm okay with going into the stores and asking questions but I don't want the guy to think I'm completely lost and try to take advantage of that either. What do you use? Gauge/choke/shot?

    Sent from my SM-N960W using Tapatalk
    id say grab a 870 combo. you wont use the rifled barrel until you want to hunt big game but itll save you some money in the long run. im grabbing a 870 in about a week, pretty sure all in with tax for the combo itll come out to about 730 bucks CAN at SAIL and basspro anyways.

    you made a right choice by asking here first, best place for advice

    if you want to practice with your new gun and be sure you wont shoot a hole in your wall maybe grab some dummy rounds to practice loading it and unloading it? just some suggestions hopefully everything goes well! good luck!

  8. #7
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    I'm surprise no one has mentioned a 16ga.....lots of ammo available (good variety), great Turkey gun and from experience great for rabbit, ground hogs, skunks and porcupines
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikePal View Post
    I'm surprise no one has mentioned a 16ga.....lots of ammo available (good variety), great Turkey gun and from experience great for rabbit, ground hogs, skunks and porcupines
    $20 a box for shells, slugs are hard to find and nothing rifles in Canada, no new guns with accessories unless you have deep pockets.

    You know my love of the 16ga but I would not tell someone to buy one, don't need any more competition for gun show ammo, ha ha, I already have you to compete with.

  10. #9
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    The NEW Browning 'Sweet 16' is a heck of a popular gun, they have a hard time keeping it on the shelf..

    https://www.browning.com/products/fi...t-sixteen.html
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikePal View Post
    The NEW Browning 'Sweet 16' is a heck of a popular gun, they have a hard time keeping it on the shelf..

    https://www.browning.com/products/fi...t-sixteen.html
    $1700 USD, compared to $400 CAD for an 870.

    I have been watching the 16ga ammo options going up and then down again in the last few years. When the A5 was brought back there were a bunch of steel loads, #2 and #4 for ducks and geese. There were 1 1/4oz loads from Federal brought back, #4,5,6, then they went away, the 1 1/4oz loads are no longer listed. You can find 1 1/8oz loads but they are not popular and there is a reason I have been collecting. They used to load lead shot from #9 to SSG and slugs as well, from 1oz to 1 1/4oz loads. The only thing you can really find now is 1 1/8oz #4 and #6 shot, the odd #1 Buck is around too and some slugs, but really tough, at least here, the US and the UK may be different.

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