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Thread: So... when did dogs forget how to swim?

  1. #11
    Getting the hang of it

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    I can see in cold and partly frozen water where they would be beneficial to help keep body heat it in the blind or boat. Or in big, rough water. I have my upland dogs wearing chest protection. Still, having had, and hunted with black labs most of my life I would also say that a PFD would likely only really slow them down and make them more tired from the extra drag they cause in the water when the dog is swimming.

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  3. #12
    Leads by example

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    A lot of energy in swimming is put towards staying afloat. By adding lift a vest means that more energy is in propelling the dog forward and there is less dog in the water which cuts "drag" more than the vest may add to it.
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  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by kickingfrog View Post
    A lot of energy in swimming is put towards staying afloat. By adding lift a vest means that more energy is in propelling the dog forward and there is less dog in the water which cuts "drag" more than the vest may add to it.
    I hadn't thought of it that way. I just remember my labs wanting to swim beside the canoe rather than be inside of it when we crossed the lake to get to my cabin. They really motored! Haha

  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by kickingfrog View Post
    A lot of energy in swimming is put towards staying afloat. By adding lift a vest means that more energy is in propelling the dog forward and there is less dog in the water which cuts "drag" more than the vest may add to it.
    Very well stated!
    With that extra buoyancy that the vest provides, it is easier for your dog to swim and also aides in his vision of the downed duck as he/she is higher out of the water and is able to see farther.
    Have you ever seen some retrievers swimming with theirs eyes and noses just barely out of the water, it makes for difficult swimming for them as they are inhaling a lot of water , this is especially hard on them in cold temperatures, a vest which adds buoyancy helps these dogs a lot.
    Last edited by jaycee; September 2nd, 2019 at 09:58 AM.

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Kavanagh View Post
    I hadn't thought of it that way. I just remember my labs wanting to swim beside the canoe rather than be inside of it when we crossed the lake to get to my cabin. They really motored! Haha
    Is it because they were never taught to be comfortable in a canoe ??, that has happened to many dogs.

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaycee View Post
    Is it because they were never taught to be comfortable in a canoe ??, that has happened to many dogs.
    No, they were great in a canoe or boat or blind. Nice a quiet and calm. Every lab I've had has just always chose the water crossing at the lake there. In rough water or very cold I'd bring them across in the canoe. My setters want to stay in the canoe. They don't like the water much more than getting their feet wet.
    Last edited by Jeff Kavanagh; September 2nd, 2019 at 08:30 PM.

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by kickingfrog View Post
    A lot of energy in swimming is put towards staying afloat. By adding lift a vest means that more energy is in propelling the dog forward and there is less dog in the water which cuts "drag" more than the vest may add to it.
    I wish I had thought of a vest a couple years ago. I had a setter that insisted on swimming across the lake at 12 years of age - 1/2 a mile?- My heart was in my throat the whole time.
    " We are more than our gender, skin color, class, sexuality or age; we are unlimited potential, and can not be defined by one label." quote

  9. #18
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    I actually have an excellent neoprene vest with floater strips down the sides. The first time Burly swam with it on, she hit the water hard as always, was swimming hard...then I saw the moment she realized the vest was helping keep her high in the water, and her ear set changed. The swimming strokes almost had a "hey, wow!" look to them as she visibly swam just as fast but wasn't working so hard. It was a great investment
    HR UH Tullamore's Gunsablazing CGN CDX SH WCX - Burly (2003-2017)
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  10. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ninepointer View Post
    Maybe its a Generation X or Millennial thing, but suddenly it seems that every dog (including water breeds!) that I see in a boat, canoe or kayak is wearing a doggy personal flotation device.

    Did I miss the memo? Did Trudeau pass a law for our own good and the good of our dogs?
    Responsible pet owners.

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