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Thread: Cormorant Bill First Reading

  1. #1
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    Default Cormorant Bill First Reading

    https://ero.ontario.ca/notice/013-4124

    update posted yesterday... hopefully this keeps progressing and doesn't get scrapped again.
    A Hunt Based Only On Trophies Taken Falls Far Short Of What The Ultimate Goal Should Be - Fred Bear

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  3. #2
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    Yup. Hope it goes thru.

    If it passes, I am putting out an open invite to any licensed person with a kayak. There are walleye and perch spawning rivers/creeks along Lake Erie that need cleaned out..
    Take the warning labels off. Darwin will solve the problem.

  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwalker View Post
    Yup. Hope it goes thru.

    If it passes, I am putting out an open invite to any licensed person with a kayak. There are walleye and perch spawning rivers/creeks along Lake Erie that need cleaned out..
    Nice.

    I bet you would have plenty of takers having 10 guys blasting away would be great. And hey if it works out to be a good fishing time it's a double win.

    Sent from my SM-G960W using Tapatalk

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    if it happens, it'll be interesting to see how long it takes them to catch on. once it becomes difficult, i see participation dropping off...
    A Hunt Based Only On Trophies Taken Falls Far Short Of What The Ultimate Goal Should Be - Fred Bear

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    As a hunter and trapper, it sounds like a really, really bad idea to me. The optics are terrible for the hunting community. In my opinion, CWS should be doing the cull. Let them take the heat and answer to the public disgust. I live in the Kawarthas. It's vacation land for the city crowds and it's high density use all summer. Example scenario - Imagine a big city family renting a cottage for a week in July or August, and the parents and the kids get to see and hear 3 guys out in a tin boat blasting off five or six boxes of shells. Lets say they shoot 100 - 150 birds. Imagine these same people seeing a heap of dead birds filling the entire boat. It will appear as nothing short of horrendous/disgusting to the average person. Are these same guys going to pay to have them disposed of at the local landfill? My bet is no, and they'll end up in an eight foot heap at the end of some road allowance, or in the ditch, covered in maggots and stinking. It will probably be a big city cottager walking their dog that finds the mess. It will be front page of the Kawartha Lakes This Week and The Reporter when the next issue comes out. This bad PR all falls back on the hunting community. I also don't agree at all with the season dates eg. shooting the adults during nesting season and leaving the hatched young to slowly die. The same cottager crowd will get to see the chicks dying from starvation when they go for a boat ride, or head out fishing. I don't care if it's a Cormorant or a rat, in my books everything deserves compassion and should be treated with some dignity and respect. CWS doesn't like the political optics so they're leaving the dirty work to us hunters. IMO it should be a high intensity cull, colony specific, by them, targeting the adults during pre-breeding when they're building their nests.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fenelon View Post
    As a hunter and trapper, it sounds like a really, really bad idea to me. The optics are terrible for the hunting community. In my opinion, CWS should be doing the cull. Let them take the heat and answer to the public disgust. I live in the Kawarthas. It's vacation land for the city crowds and it's high density use all summer. Example scenario - Imagine a big city family renting a cottage for a week in July or August, and the parents and the kids get to see and hear 3 guys out in a tin boat blasting off five or six boxes of shells. Lets say they shoot 100 - 150 birds. Imagine these same people seeing a heap of dead birds filling the entire boat. It will appear as nothing short of horrendous/disgusting to the average person. Are these same guys going to pay to have them disposed of at the local landfill? My bet is no, and they'll end up in an eight foot heap at the end of some road allowance, or in the ditch, covered in maggots and stinking. It will probably be a big city cottager walking their dog that finds the mess. It will be front page of the Kawartha Lakes This Week and The Reporter when the next issue comes out. This bad PR all falls back on the hunting community. I also don't agree at all with the season dates eg. shooting the adults during nesting season and leaving the hatched young to slowly die. The same cottager crowd will get to see the chicks dying from starvation when they go for a boat ride, or head out fishing. I don't care if it's a Cormorant or a rat, in my books everything deserves compassion and should be treated with some dignity and respect. CWS doesn't like the political optics so they're leaving the dirty work to us hunters. IMO it should be a high intensity cull, colony specific, by them, targeting the adults during pre-breeding when they're building their nests.
    Frighteningly plausible. By the way how are you at picking lotto # s.

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    If I heat with wood, I think I would be stacking and drying..NOT throwing them away. They have so much fishy oil in them, a half cord of dried birds could burn as long as a full cord of wood.
    Take the warning labels off. Darwin will solve the problem.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fenelon View Post
    As a hunter and trapper, it sounds like a really, really bad idea to me. The optics are terrible for the hunting community. In my opinion, CWS should be doing the cull. Let them take the heat and answer to the public disgust. I live in the Kawarthas. It's vacation land for the city crowds and it's high density use all summer. Example scenario - Imagine a big city family renting a cottage for a week in July or August, and the parents and the kids get to see and hear 3 guys out in a tin boat blasting off five or six boxes of shells. Lets say they shoot 100 - 150 birds. Imagine these same people seeing a heap of dead birds filling the entire boat. It will appear as nothing short of horrendous/disgusting to the average person. Are these same guys going to pay to have them disposed of at the local landfill? My bet is no, and they'll end up in an eight foot heap at the end of some road allowance, or in the ditch, covered in maggots and stinking. It will probably be a big city cottager walking their dog that finds the mess. It will be front page of the Kawartha Lakes This Week and The Reporter when the next issue comes out. This bad PR all falls back on the hunting community. I also don't agree at all with the season dates eg. shooting the adults during nesting season and leaving the hatched young to slowly die. The same cottager crowd will get to see the chicks dying from starvation when they go for a boat ride, or head out fishing. I don't care if it's a Cormorant or a rat, in my books everything deserves compassion and should be treated with some dignity and respect. CWS doesn't like the political optics so they're leaving the dirty work to us hunters. IMO it should be a high intensity cull, colony specific, by them, targeting the adults during pre-breeding when they're building their nests.
    In parts, you are absolutely correct. The problem is that to the snowflakes, we are already villainous gluttons. At least this way we are taking a step forward to help with a big problem. We will never be the squeaky wheel and no news team will ever want to pay any positive attention to outdoorsmen, it's not a good story.

    I do tend to agree with you on the timing of the season however it looks as though it might be a one and done sort of thing that puts the population in check right quick.

    The idea of poor sportsmen not disposing of the birds properly is very plausible for the initial part of the hunt, we just need to hope level heads prevail and folks do the right thing.

    Some of the chicks may die slowly, we can aim for doing our best. What of how all the islands are dying slowly, the fish being pushed from the waters around them and the other birds of prey that can no longer compete? Out of sight out of mind?

    I'm tired of being told we have to give two poops about what the big city thinks, the big shi#@y did not shape our original communities. The big city is now trying to reshape our way of life and turn our communities in to the very thing they are trying to escape from! Enough already!

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    Last edited by oaknut; November 8th, 2019 at 09:14 PM.
    How is it one careless cigarette can cause a forest fire, but it takes a whole box of matches to light a campfire?

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    Oaknut, there is not much chance of the chicks slowly starving. As soon as the parents are not there the Other Cormorants or gulls will clean out the nests of chicks and eggs.

    It's NOT cruel, it's simple the fact of Nature.
    Take the warning labels off. Darwin will solve the problem.

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwalker View Post
    Oaknut, there is not much chance of the chicks slowly starving. As soon as the parents are not there the Other Cormorants or gulls will clean out the nests of chicks and eggs.

    It's NOT cruel, it's simple the fact of Nature.
    This is also very true, I didn't even look at it through that perspective. I was thinking more of the stresses this plague of birds is putting on the species that are not "in your face" visible. Nobody will see a Loon chick starve in its nest or be pushed from its native grounds and it seems that to some what is not visible is perfectly ok.

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    How is it one careless cigarette can cause a forest fire, but it takes a whole box of matches to light a campfire?

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