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Thread: Parsnips for deer?

  1. #1
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    Default Parsnips for deer?

    Just like the title says, anyone use them? Iíve used carrots before but thinking about trying parsnips.

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  3. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by bester View Post
    Just like the title says, anyone use them? I’ve used carrots before but thinking about trying parsnips.
    I am kinda torn on these things,in my area the deer have no access to carrots and when I have thrown them out in the past they don,t seem to be interested.I have never tried them but I suppose the test would be to actually grow them and see if they hit the greens either before or after the frost.

  4. #3
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    Muskrats love parsnips. Their favourite food. Not sure about deer.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Parsnip tops can be toxic to some animals including humans, I would look into it a bit more before I went too far as I assume you are talking about cultivated parsnips not cow parsnip or wild parsnip. I assume you have access to some otherwise I would think other options would be better suited, just my opinion though

  6. #5
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    I'm with Gilroy, don't know about pasrsnips, but I tried carrots 3 years ago as could get 10lb for a couple dollars. Put them out and I never saw a bit taken out of any of them for the whole season. No carrots grown where I hunt. Now they were all gone come spring, so maybe they ate them when they got really hungry.

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    sugar beets work....

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    Thanks guys, appreciate the advise. I'm heading to WMU 47 thursday for the last weekend of bow hunting. We always take deer food up for the land owners to help the deer through the winter. I stuck with carrots, 2400 pounds for $40 down in Bradford. We found that without snow and cold weather the deer won't touch them. Even though carrots don't grow up there we've had success with them in the past.

  9. #8
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    I had a co-worker tell me they love them. But they will wait until after a good frost to dig them up.

    I've heard the same thing about apples up here as with them not touching carrots. If they've never been exposed to it, they don't know what an apple is...

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Northhunter View Post
    I had a co-worker tell me they love them. But they will wait until after a good frost to dig them up.

    I've heard the same thing about apples up here as with them not touching carrots. If they've never been exposed to it, they don't know what an apple is...
    Its kinda strange what deer will do,a couple of years ago I brought a pile of Quince from home to the hunt camp.Now there is not a chance of a Quince tree growing within a few hundred kilometers of this land,basically they need some heat units.But sure enough the deer did hit them just after the frost ,they seems to hit the most nutritious feed available and like the sugars.This is a member of the pear tree and as the European members on here know they use them back home for a marmalade.Here is a link to others experiences using this fruit.

    https://www.michigan-sportsman.com/f...-treat.156531/

  11. #10
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    They like beans, apparently. I had left some in the garden @ camp one year and and a couple came through and cleaned them out. I doubt I'd have much luck growing any in the bush though.. between the raccoons, hares and squirrels I don't think many would make it.

    I tried walk'n toss a couple years ago and it didn't take. Clearing an area for it was enough work. I have no interest in trying to change the ph of the soil. I have a site that is less acidic, but the ferns have taken over since I cleared it. Grow as tall as my chest and block the mineral lick from the trail cams.

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