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Thread: Manitoulin island

  1. #1
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    Default Manitoulin island

    Is there anyone here that lives on Manitoulin or spends a lot of time there. We're planning on moving to the island and would like some thoughts on the hunting. I know that the island is full of deer, but is it a challenge to get permission
    to hunt property's?
    What's the small game and waterfowl hunting like.
    Thanks

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    i have a dream of buying a hundred acre farm up there someday. family commitments keep me on the main land.
    When i was up in sudbury a few years ago, folks often talked about doing their waterfowl hunting on the island. i traded a box of shells for a smoker from a guy who said he doesn't bother hunting sudbury and goes to the island because of the fly way.

    I've never actually stepped foot on the island (sadly). From anecdotes from everyone who told me, the small game is similar to sudbury-- which is much better than the south
    not sure where on the island you are, but there's quite a bit of crown land within driving distance too to get you started off. check out the crown land use atlas as well as the backwood roadmaps you can get.

    not gunna lie, I'm jealous of you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fieldtrip View Post
    Is there anyone here that lives on Manitoulin or spends a lot of time there. We're planning on moving to the island and would like some thoughts on the hunting. I know that the island is full of deer, but is it a challenge to get permission
    to hunt property's?
    What's the small game and waterfowl hunting like.
    Thanks
    If youíre think that Manitoulin is full of deer, you better think again
    The deer population is very low, and going down
    Call the MNRF ask how many hunters in 2019
    And how many deer got killed you'll be surprised

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    Quote Originally Posted by skull View Post
    If you’re think that Manitoulin is full of deer, you better think again
    The deer population is very low, and going down
    Call the MNRF ask how many hunters in 2019
    And how many deer got killed you'll be surprised

    Agreed..........the deer population has plummeted in recent years as has the hunting.


    I have heard it is decent for waterfowl.


    Quote Originally Posted by punkrockerpj View Post
    i have a dream of buying a hundred acre farm up there someday.


    I've never actually stepped foot on the island (sadly).
    just curious why anyone would have a dream of buying land there but have never been there???

    Quote Originally Posted by punkrockerpj View Post
    . the small game is similar to sudbury-- which is much better than the south



    please explain to me how the small game hunting is better around Sudbury than the south??
    Last edited by duckslayer; January 21st, 2020 at 10:37 AM.
    I love fishing but REALLY it is just a way to pass time until hunting season!!!!

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    please explain to me how the small game hunting is better around Sudbury than the south??[/QUOTE]
    It probably isn't when it comes to amount of game. On the other hand it's mostly crown land which allows access to far more hunting opportunities.
    One other point about the island is that it closes its doors and windows when winter hits unless you are huge into ice fishing.
    Last edited by sawbill; January 21st, 2020 at 11:38 AM.

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    hey duckslayer...

    1. price per acre. compare either 8-12k (low in grey bruce) or 25-30 K (high in oxford or london middlesex) compared to what we see in the manitoulin area. you can buy a decent farm in the area without selling your first born. that is, if you are into pasture raising. I'd like to retire when I'm not in debt, and that is hard to do when you have close to 1 million dollars on your mortgage. there's a growing trend of young farmers going north because of the landlock.

    2. I can only speak from my own experience. Partridge and rabbits, i feel they were much easier to come by compared to Waterloo/Wellington where I am now. not as many squirrels mind you, but I'll trade the birds for tree rats any day. access to land is also much easier compared to down here. I'm curious, do you feel differently? I'd love to be more excited about small game hunting down here (excluding waterfowl of course).

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    Quote Originally Posted by punkrockerpj View Post
    hey duckslayer...

    1. price per acre. compare either 8-12k (low in grey bruce) or 25-30 K (high in oxford or london middlesex) compared to what we see in the manitoulin area. you can buy a decent farm in the area without selling your first born. that is, if you are into pasture raising. I'd like to retire when I'm not in debt, and that is hard to do when you have close to 1 million dollars on your mortgage. there's a growing trend of young farmers going north because of the landlock.

    2. I can only speak from my own experience. Partridge and rabbits, i feel they were much easier to come by compared to Waterloo/Wellington where I am now. not as many squirrels mind you, but I'll trade the birds for tree rats any day. access to land is also much easier compared to down here. I'm curious, do you feel differently? I'd love to be more excited about small game hunting down here (excluding waterfowl of course).
    Bingo, if you want a farm in SW Ontario, you need to win the lottery, Eastern Ontario is not much better. If you can raise animals on pasture and learn to make things out of veggies that have a slower growing season and utilize a greenhouse for those things with a longer growing season then you can move north and it is a lot more cost effective.

    Small game hunting is weird, SW Ontario had rabbits when I was growing up and waterfowl but almost no grouse. When I would go to the camp in Central Ontario I would get into decent grouse and some rabbits but I did not target hares much when I would have a better chance on cottontails back home. Now the coyote population is so high the rabbit numbers are way down in SW Ontario, heck, groundhogs are hard to come by on many farms.

    Good luck getting your farm, there are places around that will give you what you want. If you are looking to be self sufficient rather than make a living off it then you can find a smaller plot on poorer land and make it work, you do not need 1000 acres of prime land to have a farm if you are flexible with what you raise and grow.

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    The island holds a very special place in my heart. I've had a cottage up there since I was a kid, and still spend a lot of time there during the Summer and early Fall.

    In terms of hunting and or getting permission to hunt, it's like anywhere else -- you put the work in, and you'll be rewarded!

    -Nick
    Krete

    Bills n' Thrills.

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    Quote Originally Posted by punkrockerpj View Post
    hey duckslayer...

    1. price per acre. compare either 8-12k (low in grey bruce) or 25-30 K (high in oxford or london middlesex) compared to what we see in the manitoulin area. you can buy a decent farm in the area without selling your first born. that is, if you are into pasture raising. I'd like to retire when I'm not in debt, and that is hard to do when you have close to 1 million dollars on your mortgage. there's a growing trend of young farmers going north because of the landlock.

    2. I can only speak from my own experience. Partridge and rabbits, i feel they were much easier to come by compared to Waterloo/Wellington where I am now. not as many squirrels mind you, but I'll trade the birds for tree rats any day. access to land is also much easier compared to down here. I'm curious, do you feel differently? I'd love to be more excited about small game hunting down here (excluding waterfowl of course).
    punkrocker

    1. Ok makes sense your going bang for your buck in terms of acres per dollar. I see where your coming from but canít say Iíd go same route until I put time in to see what the land/area has to offer. Letís face it itís everyoneís dream on this site is to own their own little piece of hunting heaven but I canít say Iíd just pick a spot without ever being there and decide thatís where I want to buy. Facts are Iím never going to be able to afford a property for hunting so all the power to you and good luck finding your chunk of paradise.

    2. Yes I do feel small game hunting is MUCH better in the south compared to the Sudbury area unless grouse is your main target.

    Take it from someone who actually lives in SW Ontario rabbit populations are very good the last few years. Cottontails are booming, jack numbers will never be what they were but that is mostly due to lack of habitat........yes lots of coyotes now and that has definitely kept numbers lower but if you get into areas that still have good jack habitat you will find jacks. Also have snowshoes in pockets of larger swaps and in the northern parts of the SW. So you have all 3 species of rabbit in the south compared to Sudbury area. Grouse are no comparison yes far more in the Sudbury area but far from non existent in the south, again better in the northern parts of the region but they are here. Do some legwork and stick to larger mixed forests and you will find them, might not shoot at them but will get the crap scared out of you when they flush.........hence the evil southern grouse moniker.

    Speaking of coyotes they are more abundant and better chances of success in the south. You can call/track/use dogs for them in the south. Sudbury area calling is your only option big bush coyotes can be tough but success can be had.

    Waterfowl is hands down better in the south

    No turkeys in Sudbury, maybe a few pockets around but again no where near the numbers to the south

    As far as I know there are none of the wildlife areas around Sudbury ( like Hullett marsh) that have pheasant release programs and they still release pheasants in limited numbers to private land in some of the more southern areas of the region.

    Squirrels

    Again from someone who lives here there are groundhogs in the spring/summer, like the jacks no where near the numbers as at one time but again that has a lot to do with habitat loss, yes coyotes as well but they are only part of the equation. Again numbers are stronger to the northern parts of the region but again better hog habitat = greater hog numbers.

    Yes Sudbury is surrounded by crown land so access for what game they have is easy but in 30 years of hunting the south and putting in lots of leg work, pounding pavement scouting and interacting with farmers Iíve never had an issue having places to hunt. Kinda makes me wonder how guys present themselves to have such tough times getting permission.
    I love fishing but REALLY it is just a way to pass time until hunting season!!!!

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    Yeah I know that the deer population is down, but still see more deer there than here. We're not going there because of that anyway, and I know it's always a challenge to get permission to hunt. Sometimes that's the hardest part of hunting.
    I was just hoping to hear some inspirational stories, or tales, of hunting various game on the island.
    Thanks

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