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Thread: Worlds First Torsion Crossbow

  1. #11
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    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=bOcOPGRHp6w

    Deer hog hunt video
    hard to judge the sound but does seem fairly quite not the same twang

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  3. #12
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    I am not sure, looks like a pretty cool thing but not sure if those round string holders (for lack of a better term) will last all that long.. There must be a lot of energy stored and then whipped out of them....
    "Everything is easy when you know how"
    "Meat is not grown in stores"

  4. #13
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    This is cool,thanx for posting.

    As far what i would like to see in the archery world is-the Benjamin Pioneer Airbow,or the PCP Umarex Airbow.

    Likely never will happen.

  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by fratri View Post
    I am not sure, looks like a pretty cool thing but not sure if those round string holders (for lack of a better term) will last all that long.
    It will take a season or two in the field to see how the hardware holds up. I saw on the company web site that they sell spare string kits for $34 and the crossbow kit comes with the tools needed to change them yourself.
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fox View Post
    Ya, it would just depend on what they determine is necessary. It is not a longbow, recurve, compound bow or crossbow. If the definition is energy trapped in a limb then sure but that may not be the case.
    It is still a string and arrow.

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by BPR 30-06 View Post
    It is still a string and arrow.
    Here are the definitions in the MNRF Regulations Summary.

    "Firearms include rifles, shotguns, muzzle-loading guns, air or pellet guns and bows (including longbows, crossbows, compound bows and recurve bows)"

    Will this fall into the category of "longbows, crossbows, compound bows and recurve bows".

    It sure as heck is not a crossbow, maybe you could call it a scroll bow.

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fox View Post
    It sure as heck is not a crossbow, maybe you could call it a scroll bow.
    If they can convince the MNR/DNR regulators that the coiled springs (containing the energy) are 'Limbs' then it's good to go....
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

  9. #18
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    Interesting. If proven to be durable, there sure are some nice advantages to it

  10. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikePal View Post
    If they can convince the MNR/DNR regulators that the coiled springs (containing the energy) are 'Limbs' then it's good to go....
    Ya, just a matter of how they define it, at the moment it does not sit into any current category. This would be cool and so would that blank cartridge firing "arrow gun" for lack of a better term.

  11. #20
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    Reality....the Hunting regs for crossbow don't mention anything about limbs...this has a legal draw weight, legal arrow length and a rail (ramp) for the arrow to load on.

    The draw length of a bow (compound, recurve, long) is the measured distance from the outer edge of the main riser (handle),
    following the line of an arrow to the string at the anchor point. The draw length of a crossbow is measured along the bolt ramp (where the bolt rests) from the outer edge of the main limb, to the anchor point (release latch mechanism) at full draw.
    Arrows must be at least 60cm (23.6 inches)in length. The length of an arrow is measured from the base of the arrowhead to the bottom of the nock slot. A broadhead used for hunting big game or wild turkey must be at least 22mm (0.87 inches) wide and have at least two sharp cutting edges.
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

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