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Thread: are beaver dam ponds any good?

  1. #1
    Just starting out

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    Default are beaver dam ponds any good?

    New to waterfowl, not sure if i found an ok spot near Barrie. Saw a fair size pond on google maps. Went out. Water was freely flowing between two mounds and the pond was a lot more depleted than the sat photos showed. Is there any chance this kind of area would be worth duck hunting? Does the "beaver" need to plug the dam first? I saw two turkeys on my way back, no signs of deer or grouse. Area was mostly pine and major highway nearby. Making the most of the Corona virus situation.

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    Longtime Lurker, First time caller

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  3. #2
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    In my experience it could be decent or could be a complete dud. It's an endless search trying to find good duck hunting spots, letting the birds lead you to where they want to be is the name of the game. Having a series of spots and checking them regularly leading up to and throughout the season will bring you success. Just add it to your list and keep searching, you'll know if its any good by the time the season comes around.

  4. #3
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    There is a series of Beaver dams/ponds at our cottage that hold decent numbers of ducks and geese depending on the time of year
    They say a man turns old when sorrow and regret take the place of hope and dreams

  5. #4
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    Remote beaver ponds are usually quite good as long as they hold food that ducks and geese like to eat. Puddle ducks love them.
    Last edited by trimmer21; March 17th, 2020 at 10:56 PM.
    Fate whispers to the warrior "I don't think you're prepared from the coming storm" The warrior smiles at Fate and whispers "I am the storm."

  6. #5
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    Beaver ponds are fun to hunt

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  7. #6
    Has too much time on their hands

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    We hunt the same beaver pond for the duck opener every year. Always produces well! Woodies, Teal and Mallards.

    -Nick
    Krete

    Bills n' Thrills.

  8. #7
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    I've always found beaver ponds to be great first and last hour spots. Worthwhile mid-day action can happen during the migration but is highly unpredictable.
    "What calm deer hunter's heart has not skipped a beat when the stillness of a cold November morning is broken by the echoes of hounds tonguing yonder?"

  9. #8
    Has too much time on their hands

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    Beaver ponds are great spots but could be a roosting pond. That being said could be a fast morning hunt and good before they go to bed. If it is a roosting spot don't hunt it to much because they will figure you out fast and go else where to sleep
    "Give a man a fish and he eats for a day, Teach a man to fish and he eats for the rest of his life"

  10. #9
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    Like they have said. A few quiet evening drives around your ponds will tell you which ones have birds.

    As for scaring them off the ponds by hunting the roost. Not shooting them when they are grouped up in the morning or coming to roost at night will help. In the morning they will leave in a large group, but come back in groups of two, three or four. By shooting at the small groups and single birds it takes longer for them to figure it out.

    If the weather stays as wet as it is now there will likely be lots of ponds and puddles to hunt.
    Take the warning labels off. Darwin will solve the problem.

  11. #10
    Leads by example

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    like snowwalker said, don't shoot at them while on the pond. Wait for evening return or if they come back mid morning take what you can fast and leave. We do this with a goose pond we hunt. Geese come in about 9 to 10 am, so we show up just before that, shoot the singles and pairs so we don't teach the 200 birds.

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