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Thread: Home made Lonzino

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by greatwhite View Post
    Kosher salt will work at least according to everything I have read. You could use table salt but would give a very salty taste harder to wash off.
    I guess it may be because it's not ground like a sausage would be. However when I cure pork loin for smoked back bacon it does use curing salt.
    Smitty

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  3. #12
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    That process requires sodium nitrate or nitrite....not just salt. Good luck

  4. #13
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    No it does not

    Quote Originally Posted by dilly View Post
    That process requires sodium nitrate or nitrite....not just salt. Good luck
    "This is about unenforceable registration of weapons that violates the rights of people to own firearms."—Premier Ralph Klein (Alberta)Calgary Herald, 1998 October 9 (November 1, 1942 – March 29, 2013)

  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by dilly View Post
    That process requires sodium nitrate or nitrite....not just salt. Good luck
    That's right, if any of the Insta Cure products are used, no.1 or no.2 which all the recipes I found call for, sodium nitrate is one of the included items in it , one has a little more of it than the other.

  6. #15
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    I think it was last year I saw a good video of a smokehouse in the states that used only salt and brown sugar for their cure to make bacon, so it can be done without nitrites or nitrates. I finally found it on line, it's a good watch. Looks like they do their hams the same way.
    https://www.eater.com/2019/2/18/1822...-process-video

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    Last edited by smitty55; March 27th, 2020 at 12:27 PM.
    Smitty

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  7. #16
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    Yeah my buddy made some like this last year. I'm going to try it in the fall

    Quote Originally Posted by smitty55 View Post
    I think it was last year I saw a good video of a smokehouse in the states that used only salt and brown sugar for their cure to make bacon, so it can be done without nitrites or nitrates. I finally found it on line, it's a good watch. Looks like they do their hams the same way.
    https://www.eater.com/2019/2/18/1822...-process-video

    Cheers
    "This is about unenforceable registration of weapons that violates the rights of people to own firearms."—Premier Ralph Klein (Alberta)Calgary Herald, 1998 October 9 (November 1, 1942 – March 29, 2013)

  8. #17
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    You should have a humidity chamber to grow the proper mold on it if not using nitrates. And I think you are making venison prosciutto, not pastrami....

  9. #18
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    You said “from what I’ve read”....you need to read more....

  10. #19
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    Seems to work good where I have it.


    Quote Originally Posted by dilly View Post
    You should have a humidity chamber to grow the proper mold on it if not using nitrates. And I think you are making venison prosciutto, not pastrami....
    "This is about unenforceable registration of weapons that violates the rights of people to own firearms."—Premier Ralph Klein (Alberta)Calgary Herald, 1998 October 9 (November 1, 1942 – March 29, 2013)

  11. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by greatwhite View Post
    Seems to work good where I have it.
    Never mind GW ...I see that the people ( inBosnia, Croatia, Serbia and Montenegro) who inventing the process didn't have fancy 'humidity chambers'....they used mother nature HaHa..

    The cuts are first brined in solution of salt and garlic (locally "salamura"), to enhance flavor and help preservation, commonly together with continental-style bacon ("slanina" locally), lardon (also called "slanina", sometimes "white bacon" or "soap bacon") and ribs. Then they are cured by hanging them in freezing winter winds, over a smoldering lumber (smoke being essential part of the flavor) for typically up to two months, because the freezing continental temperatures and lack of insects in the winter help curing and preservation. The smolder is occasionally extinguished completely to expose the meat fully to the freezing wind.
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

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