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Thread: Crossbow aim

  1. #1
    Just starting out

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    Default Crossbow aim

    My son and I are just starting to use a crossbow. We have been practicing and sighting it in. Just when we think it's good( 2"grouping at 30yrds) the arrows start to go 6-8 inches right for both of us.
    The kicker is my daughter can shoot the same 3 arrows and never miss.
    Is it something we're doing?
    Any ideas?

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  3. #2
    Has too much time on their hands

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    Are you using a cocking aid for the bow? Not having the string come into the catch perfectly centered can toss the arrows around a bit.

    Sent from my SM-G960W using Tapatalk
    How is it one careless cigarette can cause a forest fire, but it takes a whole box of matches to light a campfire?

  4. #3
    Getting the hang of it

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    Quote Originally Posted by oaknut View Post
    Are you using a cocking aid for the bow? Not having the string come into the catch perfectly centered can toss the arrows around a bit.

    Sent from my SM-G960W using Tapatalk
    This was common with older crossbows for sure.
    One also has to remember that the same shooting mistakes made shooting a rifle will happen with a crossbow and usually compounded. For example the trigger pull is usually considerably more that the average rifle.
    You'll need to break it down and eliminate any variables. Eg, shorten distance, start with a bench rest, etc., to see where it's coming from. Likely shooting error is my guess.

  5. #4
    Just starting out

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    Just been pulling it back and cocking it by hand.
    It's about a year old.

  6. #5
    Has too much time on their hands

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wake View Post
    Just been pulling it back and cocking it by hand.
    It's about a year old.
    I will place my bet, that is where your issue is coming from.

    With a black sharpie, nail polish or something else that will stick, mark where the string meets the rail on both sides. When you the bow be sure that those two marks are the same distance from the rail on each side.

    Or get a cocking aid, they are cheap and offer repeatable accuracy.

    Sent from my SM-G960W using Tapatalk
    How is it one careless cigarette can cause a forest fire, but it takes a whole box of matches to light a campfire?

  7. #6
    Getting the hang of it

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    What type of bow?

    If you have a scope what type is it?

    Silly question but was there a crosswind?

    Getting a rope cocker is a great suggestion!

    Common issues to check:

    Cam timing, when cocked is the string and cables in the same place on the both sides.

    Broken scope, crossbows vibrations are hard on scopes and the reticle can come loose and start to float.

    Different arrows or arrow heads will impact different places.

    Changing your grip. Crossbows are different from rifles and should be gripped firmly so the inertia does not move it during firing. If you are shooting a bench for example you may see different points of impact when you hold the bow with 2 hands versus 1 and loosely versus tight.

    Rifle scope vs crossbow scope. If you are using a rifle scope the parallax may be sufficient at 30 yards to throw the arrows off if your cheek and eye are not in exactly the same place twice.

    It should not have much impact at 30 yards but make sure the bow is level.

    Hope this helps.



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  8. #7
    Member for Life

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    You should be using a cocking aid and not by hand. If you have an Excalibur and use the cocking aid that comes with the bow, you should have no problem

  9. #8
    Needs a new keyboard

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    Pay attention to the arrows - see if there is a pattern which could indicate if one of the arrows is behaving differently than the others.

  10. #9
    Needs a new keyboard

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    Quote Originally Posted by oaknut View Post
    I will place my bet, that is where your issue is coming from.

    With a black sharpie, nail polish or something else that will stick, mark where the string meets the rail on both sides. When you the bow be sure that those two marks are the same distance from the rail on each side.

    Or get a cocking aid, they are cheap and offer repeatable accuracy.

    Sent from my SM-G960W using Tapatalk
    I agree with this assessment. By the time you figure you're good and sighted in, and then you start to lose your groups, your arms have tired some and your strong arm is pulling more on the string. This causes your shots to go wide.

    In addition to the suggestions above, liquid paper on the string works to make sure you're pulling back consistently as well. A rope cocking aid is by far your best bet.

    Sent from my SM-A520W using Tapatalk
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  11. #10
    Needs a new keyboard

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    My son had the same issue and it ended up being shooter error. About 75% of the time he was lifting his head to see the impact too soon. Because he was doing it in a roughly consistent manner the error was roughly consistent. It is sort of like not keeping your eye on the ball golfing. Lift you head too soon to see where the ball is going and you end up slicing.
    They say a man turns old when sorrow and regret take the place of hope and dreams

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