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Thread: Beardless Tom

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fox View Post
    It could be genetic, there are bearded hens, something in their genes causes that.
    In Ontario bearded toms have been culled from the population for 30 years. Have yet to see or hear of a true beardless bird. Don't believe this will ever be an issue.
    Time in the outdoors is never wasted

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by finsfurfeathers View Post
    In Ontario bearded toms have been culled from the population for 30 years. Have yet to see or hear of a true beardless bird. Don't believe this will ever be an issue.
    If he's still around come fall, I'll use my Hen/Tom tag and see if he has any hair stubble under that chest full of feathers....but I wouldn't shoot him as a Bearded Turkey in the spring (not visible) . That's probably why you don't hear much about it happening...you'd have to admit killing an illegal bird.
    Last edited by MikePal; June 11th, 2020 at 10:54 AM.
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikePal View Post
    If he's still around come fall, I'll use my Hen/Tom tag and see if he has any hair stubble under that chest full of feathers....but I wouldn't shoot him as a Bearded Turkey in the spring (not visible) . That's probably why you don't hear much about it happening...you'd have to admit killing an illegal bird.
    Yes the only way to positively identify a non visible bearded Tom as a true beardless Tom is a necropsy. That would answer the question if it was due to genetic deficiency or due to physical wear and tear however anecdotally you rarely hear a hunter report seeing a beardless toms out there. In any case as I said above need to pass on a bird if you don't see that beard in the spring.
    Time in the outdoors is never wasted

  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by finsfurfeathers View Post
    This would apply if no beard was a genetic trait. Don't think is an issue as there is not a significant report of verified beardless Toms. I'd speculate the beard is there but lost due to some physical circumstance.
    This old bird was down to two visible strands and if he kept his distance would of passed as a breadless Tom however fortunately for me walk too within yards for a visible confirmation.
    [url=https://flic.kr/p/23LxukS]
    In any case good to error on caution as the possibility may exist however unlikely
    A little off topic, I have never plucked one before, (maybe next bird I might) is it that tough to do and how do you cook him?
    Thanks
    "Everything is easy when you know how"
    "Meat is not grown in stores"

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by fratri View Post
    A little off topic, I have never plucked one before, (maybe next bird I might) is it that tough to do and how do you cook him?
    Thanks
    I find it easy however been doing it forever. Wet method just like a chicken. For me its the best way to maximize utilization of the bird. Once the bird is plucked do make sure the feet are well scalded too which makes peeling off the outer skin/scale easy. To process the bird I break it down. Breast comes off skinless to use as cutlets much like you do already. Thighs with the skin comes off to use as a pot roast. Drumsticks can go either in the stock pot if I'm in the mode for a meatier soup or can be used in a pulled turkey recipe. Heart, stomach, and liver is recovered. Liver I'm not a fan of but dad likes it. The Heart and stomach are braised and used in a fine risotto recipe made with the turkey stock. Into the stock pot goes the neck, carcass including the wings, feet, and skin including that jelly mass around the crop.
    Basically just the head and toe nails end up getting tossed. Waste not want not.
    Time in the outdoors is never wasted

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by fratri View Post
    I have never plucked one before, (maybe next bird I might) is it that tough to do and how do you cook him?
    Frank...dry plucking is the easiest and cleanest. Do it when the carcass is still warm and the feathers come out easy. Pull down in small clumps....don't try to big a handfull or you'll tear the skin. The wings feathers are hard to do, so I just cut off the wings at the first knuckle and don't bother plucking them.

    It's a lot less messy when the feathers stay dry. Just throw them in a garbage can beside the table. A few fly away but I see other birds use them to build their nest with.

    It takes me 10-15 minutes to do a 20 lb Tom..usually done in the time it would take to boil a pot of water. Carcass still warm when I'm finished.

    Spice rub the bird, stuff if desired, then put the bird in one of those 'Oven Bags' you see at the grocery store. Cook slow, low heat (320-350) and use a meat thermometer to test when done.
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikePal View Post
    Frank...dry plucking is the easiest and cleanest. Do it when the carcass is still warm and the feathers come out easy. Pull down in small clumps....don't try to big a handfull or you'll tear the skin. The wings feathers are hard to do, so I just cut off the wings at the first knuckle and don't bother plucking them.

    It's a lot less messy when the feathers stay dry. Just throw them in a garbage can beside the table. A few fly away but I see other birds use them to build their nest with.

    It takes me 10-15 minutes to do a 20 lb Tom..usually done in the time it would take to boil a pot of water. Carcass still warm when I'm finished.

    Spice rub the bird, stuff if desired, then put the bird in one of those 'Oven Bags' you see at the grocery store. Cook slow, low heat (320-350) and use a meat thermometer to test when done.
    I might give this a try this fall if I connect with a bird, I like the idea of leaving the mess in the bush .....
    "Everything is easy when you know how"
    "Meat is not grown in stores"

  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by finsfurfeathers View Post
    I find it easy however been doing it forever. Wet method just like a chicken. For me its the best way to maximize utilization of the bird. Once the bird is plucked do make sure the feet are well scalded too which makes peeling off the outer skin/scale easy. To process the bird I break it down. Breast comes off skinless to use as cutlets much like you do already. Thighs with the skin comes off to use as a pot roast. Drumsticks can go either in the stock pot if I'm in the mode for a meatier soup or can be used in a pulled turkey recipe. Heart, stomach, and liver is recovered. Liver I'm not a fan of but dad likes it. The Heart and stomach are braised and used in a fine risotto recipe made with the turkey stock. Into the stock pot goes the neck, carcass including the wings, feet, and skin including that jelly mass around the crop.
    Basically just the head and toe nails end up getting tossed. Waste not want not.
    Thanks for the reply..... I am not so sure I can keep/cook the heart, stomach or liver though...
    "Everything is easy when you know how"
    "Meat is not grown in stores"

  10. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by finsfurfeathers View Post
    In Ontario bearded toms have been culled from the population for 30 years. Have yet to see or hear of a true beardless bird. Don't believe this will ever be an issue.
    How long have elephants been killed for their tusks?

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/african...e-of-poaching/

  11. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fox View Post
    How long have elephants been killed for their tusks?

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/african...e-of-poaching/
    Don't know as I don't hunt elephant.
    You can not extrapolate the causal effect between elephants and turkeys. First have to determine if a population of true beardless toms exist. At the moment don't even know if this genetic trait exist.
    Time in the outdoors is never wasted

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