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Thread: What without a doubt simply works?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Menard View Post
    I've learned a few things over the years that have made me a better deer hunter. In no particular order, here are some tips: Read whatever you can about deer and deer hunting. Pay attention to what successful hunters are doing. Old timers aren't necessarily the best hunters, be objective. Go into the woods properly equipped for a period longer than you intend to be out. Have a plan but be flexible. Don't leave a stand too early. Don't over-hunt your stand; have alternative stand sites. Try to hunt all day; bring a lunch. Be familiar with the general area --> know how deer use the area. Know where other hunters are likely to be. Get away from the crowds but don't overlook those small woodlots next to the road. Try calling and rattling, but don't overdo it. If you see a deer that you don't intend to shoot, remain quiet and leave it alone; you never know what might be following.
    Great summary Sam.I like especially the advice to learn as much as it is possible.It is priceless.There is never to much knowledge which one can absorb. If interested .Many people i know skip this step,for whatever reason.
    Mind You,for different style of hunting,different set of knowledge is needed.Of course -basics, like wind ,movement,concealment are a must for most of the hunting styles.
    I have a friend,quite experienced deer hunter,and quite successful too.He knows his areas very good-yet since he hunts private,of that 70% over bait,he may would be lost in public woods-especially crowded,pay for use places.His knowledge when to bait,what to use for bait,and when to hunt baits with most success ,would be useless in public places.
    Other thing is important-keep the lessons learned "handy"and try to apply them as applicable.More then once it took me few trips/occasions or failures to realize-i knew about this one,just failed to recognize it.
    Last edited by gbk; September 14th, 2020 at 07:11 PM.

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  3. #12
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    Having a bit of luck always helps!

    But seriously, after doing right all the basic thigs always mentioned (wind, movement, scent, stealth, comfort, patience, confidence, knowing your firearm, & knowing your limits, etc. ...) you still need to be in a spot where deer will likely travel within range during legal shooting hours.
    In my experience, finding such places is actually the key to success. It requires good safe bedding area nearby (swamps are the best), easy access to food source/fields, and no hunting disturbance. If public, it must be as far-away and and hard to access as possible.
    I know one of these spots, and hunt it only once or twice a season.
    “Think safety first and then have a good hunt.”
    - Tom Knapp -

  4. #13
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    Since deer are living animals, they can be unpredictable. Having said that, deer (especially does and fawns) can develop habits e.g. using the same feeding/bedding areas, travel routes, etc. Deer tend to stick to these habits until an interruption happens. To be successful, you need to be aware of these habits and slip into areas without bothering the deer. Locating travel routes, particularly funnels, is a great way to successfully get onto deer.

  5. #14
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    My CTC Muck Boots..never let me down, always work.
    Mark Snow, Libertarian Kemptville, for 2020, Ontario Libertarian Party

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by GW11 View Post
    I'd say not letting yourself get mentally worn down. It's easy enough to get into a negative frame of mind if things haven't been going your way. What works for me is to maintain the belief that as long as you're hunting where there are deer that anything can happen at just about any moment, usually when you're least expecting it to.

    Keeping a positive outlook. Sounds corny, but it can make the difference between being ready when your chance arrives or getting caught of guard and blowing that chance.

    Sent from my SM-A520W using Tapatalk
    THIS, there has been a couple times when we come back for the day where thoughts go through my head ( will I even see one this year)

    Next morning my mindset seems to change instantly, every moment I'm out there scanning the bush lines and repeating to myself they're comin they're here, sure enough an hour later 1 pops out.

    State of mind is king!

    It does seem stupid now that I type it out, but honestly I feel like that has helped alot. It also takes you longer to get cold when you're thinking that way, this isn't just for whitetail goes for everything

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  7. #16
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    A STRANGE technique to deal with scent issues. Had a co-worker that started to wear his hunting clothes at work about two or three months before season. After work he would stop by his stand and hang them in the stand. Everyday he replaced the outfit with a freshly wore one. Now this was on a farm, so may not work so good in the woods.
    Take the warning labels off. Darwin will solve the problem.

  8. #17
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    1. Bait and wind.

    Bait early and consistently. Make sure the winds in your face and your not blocking the deers usual travel route.

    Might not get the biggest bucks but you will see deer.

    2. Get out in the woods, not going to see anything in the cabin for lunch.

    3. Walk if feasible. Not going to see anything driving out to your stand on a four wheeler. Have shot multiple deers walking in.


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  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bowjob View Post
    THIS, there has been a couple times when we come back for the day where thoughts go through my head ( will I even see one this year)

    Next morning my mindset seems to change instantly, every moment I'm out there scanning the bush lines and repeating to myself they're comin they're here, sure enough an hour later 1 pops out.

    State of mind is king!

    It does seem stupid now that I type it out, but honestly I feel like that has helped alot. It also takes you longer to get cold when you're thinking that way, this isn't just for whitetail goes for everything

    Sent from my SM-G960W using Tapatalk
    Right on! A positive attitude in all things is very important not only when hunting,but,with life in general. I always try to find the good in everything,even when the bottom seems to be falling out of everything around us.
    Remember May 1,2020 when they say "We don't want your hunting guns".

  10. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Menard View Post
    Try calling and rattling, but don't overdo it. If you see a deer that you don't intend to shoot, remain quiet and leave it alone; you never know what might be following.
    This is the reason I don't apply for doe tag. I can't count how many times a buck or bucks were following behind just out of sight from a doe or does. If I had pulled the trigger I'd never known the nice bucks that I would have missed out on. Some were close behind, some were 5-30mins behind.
    I hunt for meat not antlers, I want the heaviest animal for the most amount of meat.

  11. #20
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    Avoid the erect white tail and the flared tarsal glands as much as possible, especially if you're hunting the entire bow season on small properties or limited access.

    It's the view we've all seen many times, the white flag bounding away, but rarely mentioned is that there's an alarm/danger scent associated with a spooked deer that's hightailing it away from you.

    Sometimes it's impossible to prevent, but a lot of times it's not.
    Alert a deer hard enough and their tail and rump will flare up and their tarsal glands will swell, causing a smell that all deer downwind will associate with danger and any droplets that fall to the ground can linger for days.

    Have this occur in feeding or bedding areas over a couple of days in a row and most mature deer will all but vacate those areas during daylight hours. If your real unlucky they'll abandon those areas all together and find new sources.

    I look at my hunting spots this way.
    I figure it's a given that the most mature bucks in my area will immediately start reducing their daylight activity the minute they start smelling my scent that I'm leaving in all the places they like to visit.
    If I'm creating alarm scent along with my scent too often in areas I plan to hunt, I'll be just simply adding a lot more deer to that list and possibly making the dominant bucks completely nocturnal.

    Understanding the deer's body language and knowing how your body language forces a deer's response is paramount in preventing the unneeded smell of danger throughout your hunting area.
    You're only as good as your first shot of the day. Know your limitations and make it count.
    ...FC 2012

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