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Thread: Any Advice for my First Centerpin Setup?

  1. #11
    Getting the hang of it

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    Hey guys, love the 'camo' idea on the flouro leader; never heard of that before but will definitely try it. Just remember, some of these 'steadfast rules' that many steelheaders have, are subject to the main waters they fish in. 10 lb flouro leaders work fine this time of year in dirtier water like the Natawassaga, but would be ill-advised in the clearer creeks in the east end. Also, very light lines are great for landing big fish if there are hardly any trees, stumps, obstructions during the fight. If you have any of these, you probably need a heftier flouro leader in 6-10 lb range for steelhead. You'll definitely get less hookups, but land more fish. Apparently, flouro lasts as long as the plastic water bottles if broken off, so that is a consideration if you are going to probably break off a lot of long leaders. Finally, your 8lb leader suggestion for salmon seems a bit light to me, once again, unless you are in very open water. But in wood choked streams, if you wish to land them, you can even go higher than your main line since the diameter of something similar (10 lb flouro for example), or even slightly larger (12 lb for example), will still be smaller than mono or braid. My favourite flouro in both of these lb test ranges mentioned by the way for salmon is Stren, and this has been discovered through massive trial and error using every brand of flouro imaginable. Due to their less intense fights, steelhead won't require as tough a line, so I agree, pick the less expensive ones. Good luck centrepinning and hop to see you on the stream!

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  3. #12
    Just starting out

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkB View Post
    Well, if you caught a brown, it means something worked! Was the water clear or somewhat dirty?

    In clear water, I honestly don't think you'll get away with 6 lb fluoro lead ... you'll probably need something more like 4 lb (or less, like 3.8 lb).
    One thing I used to do is add the tiniest quick snap swivel you could imagine on the main line, and then added an 8' leader to that ... it allowed me to setup a bunch of leads, with weights all staggered (minimum used, added more if necessary), and I rolled them around a pool noodle off cut ... could add 6 on one piece no problem. If anything happened with one lead, it was easy, take it off, unroll a new one and connect it up. The only thing I didn't like is the memory the fluoro line had when wrapped around the pool noodle, it was a bit of a spiral, but I don't think that really impacted the fishing all that much.
    I'm not sure if this was clear in my first post, but I caught the brown in a private pond that I stock so it has very little fishing pressure. The water was clear, but I think the lack of pressure is why I got away with a 6lbs leader. I will definitely bring some 4lbs flouro when I finally get a chance to fish an actual river.

    That's also a great idea with the snaps. I will definitely have to use the pool noodle idea to store rigs. Seems like that saves a ton of time.

    Tight lines!

    Sent from my Mi MIX 2 using Tapatalk

  4. #13
    Just starting out

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    Quote Originally Posted by retrofish View Post
    Hey guys, love the 'camo' idea on the flouro leader; never heard of that before but will definitely try it. Just remember, some of these 'steadfast rules' that many steelheaders have, are subject to the main waters they fish in. 10 lb flouro leaders work fine this time of year in dirtier water like the Natawassaga, but would be ill-advised in the clearer creeks in the east end. Also, very light lines are great for landing big fish if there are hardly any trees, stumps, obstructions during the fight. If you have any of these, you probably need a heftier flouro leader in 6-10 lb range for steelhead. You'll definitely get less hookups, but land more fish. Apparently, flouro lasts as long as the plastic water bottles if broken off, so that is a consideration if you are going to probably break off a lot of long leaders. Finally, your 8lb leader suggestion for salmon seems a bit light to me, once again, unless you are in very open water. But in wood choked streams, if you wish to land them, you can even go higher than your main line since the diameter of something similar (10 lb flouro for example), or even slightly larger (12 lb for example), will still be smaller than mono or braid. My favourite flouro in both of these lb test ranges mentioned by the way for salmon is Stren, and this has been discovered through massive trial and error using every brand of flouro imaginable. Due to their less intense fights, steelhead won't require as tough a line, so I agree, pick the less expensive ones. Good luck centrepinning and hop to see you on the stream!
    Thanks for your reply and all of that information.

    I'll definitely purchase a wider variety of leaders than I have at the moment to match river conditions. I plan on fishing different rivers, and I understand it's important to use an appropriate leader based on the cover and clarity. I was under the impression that you shouldn't fish a heavier rated leader than that of your mainline so that you don't loose your float when you break off. If you break off a fish or snag with a heavier leader, wouldn't you break your mainline and loose your whole rig?

    In terms of breaking off with flourocarbon, I completely agree. I don't want to be hooking tons of fish and loosing them, leaving my rig in the water. It makes more sense to land more but get less bites than the other way around.

    This is great advice. Thanks again and tight lines!

    Sent from my Mi MIX 2 using Tapatalk

  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdamG1 View Post
    I'm not sure if this was clear in my first post, but I caught the brown in a private pond that I stock so it has very little fishing pressure. The water was clear, but I think the lack of pressure is why I got away with a 6lbs leader. I will definitely bring some 4lbs flouro when I finally get a chance to fish an actual river.

    That's also a great idea with the snaps. I will definitely have to use the pool noodle idea to store rigs. Seems like that saves a ton of time.

    Tight lines!

    Sent from my Mi MIX 2 using Tapatalk
    No doubt, spooked fish are harder to catch ... but none-the-less, I still think browns are easy to spook, and hard to get ... I'm sure if you threw in a 20 lb line ... it wouldn't have worked so well. So, you had to be doing something right ... maybe it was easier, but a non-pressured pond won't give you a pass to anything.

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkB View Post
    No doubt, spooked fish are harder to catch ... but none-the-less, I still think browns are easy to spook, and hard to get ... I'm sure if you threw in a 20 lb line ... it wouldn't have worked so well. So, you had to be doing something right ... maybe it was easier, but a non-pressured pond won't give you a pass to anything.
    I definitely agree. I think my setup was proper and I had tied good spawn bags, so I could get away with 6lbs line. The browns in the pond seem to react much better to baits like worms and spawn rather than moving baits like spinners and spoons, so it's a good place to practice with my centerpin. Anyways, thanks for all the help and tight lines!

    Sent from my Mi MIX 2 using Tapatalk

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