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Thread: What would be the Moose population in Ontario if nobody... would .. hunt ... Moose ...?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bellerivercrossbowhunter View Post
    Remember the Buffalo story. We can bring the Moose back if we try.

    The Bison: from 30 million to 325 (1884) to 500,000 (today)!!!
    They also slaughtered them by thousands tho .

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  3. #12
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    There is a natural control of moose populations in southern areas of the province that has nothing to do with hunting. This is the brainworm that will kill moose, but has less drastic effects on white-tailed deer. So where the population ranges of these species start to overlap moose survival is compromised.

  4. #13
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    What would the moose population be if we kept hunting them but decommissioned the majority of trails and logging roads in Ontario’s wilderness Areas and closed the majority of Ontario’s crown land to motorized vehicles?
    Last edited by outdoorlife; October 28th, 2020 at 08:31 PM.

  5. #14
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    Forestry planting trees on the logging roads to ,
    some roads are grown in and becoming wilderness again .


    Quote Originally Posted by outdoorlife View Post
    What would the moose population be if we kept hunting them but decommissioned the majority of trails and logging roads in Ontario’s wilderness Areas and closed the majority of Ontario’s crown land to motorized vehicles?

  6. #15
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    I know in our area of 42, there are somewhat large tracts of land that go largely unhunted due to access and the moose appear to be doing very well. Lots of cows, lots of calves. The bulls don't show themselves too much, but we know they're there.

    Anyone remember Isle Royal? A somewhat perfect example of the natural fluctuation between moose/wolves/habitat without hunting. The issue as it compares to most of mainland Ontario is here the wolves always have something to fall back on when moose numbers aren't quite there. Be it deer (I never heard of whitetails on Royal, so I am assuming there were not), livestock, etc.

  7. #16
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    imagine the idiots that thought a cow was a calf and all them stories didnt happen.
    Guy this year in my area shot a bull thinking it was a god dam cow, like honestly the stupidity of these kinds of hunters are just as bad as all the other poaching and stuff, got a 300 dollar fine have a nice day.
    cheap fine for someone that's trigger happy.

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by outdoorlife View Post
    What would the moose population be if we kept hunting them but decommissioned the majority of trails and logging roads in Ontario’s wilderness Areas and closed the majority of Ontario’s crown land to motorized vehicles?
    That could happen quite easily. Before the advent of ATV's,the only way to access prime Moose habitat was by watercraft,by snowmobile after freeze up or on foot. Populations closely matched the carrying capacity of the area. Easy accessibility hasn't done us or Moose population any favors. Couple that with disasterous revenue-driven Moose management tag allocation policies,it's not rocket science to see the net result. OMNRF always stated that management techniques were "science-based",but,when politics entered the picture,everything "science-based" quickly went out the window.
    Remember May 1,2020 when they say "We don't want your hunting guns".
    There's nothing that can screw up an academic's mind faster than being told there's absolutely no logical reason for the alphabet to be in order.

  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by trimmer21 View Post
    "science-based",but,when politics entered the picture,everything "science-based" quickly went out the window.
    I thought our government took the science based facts pretty serious [emoji23].

    Or is that just another lie our pm moisly spits out of his mouth [emoji23] because we are in a pandemic [emoji849]


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  10. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by trimmer21 View Post
    Couple that with disasterous revenue-driven Moose management tag allocation policies,it's not rocket science to see the net result. OMNRF always stated that management techniques were "science-based",but,when politics entered the picture,everything "science-based" quickly went out the window.
    T, I never believed tag allocation was ever revenue driven because the total revenue generated from moose license sales would barely keep the lights on for a year in most district offices. I do believe however the allocations had to do with pressure from lobbyists such as hunters organizations, tourist operators, etc who demanded more tag availability and then ran off to their local representative MP for support.
    Too, there was an era just prior to Atvs where VW dune buggies were everywhere and I often wonder if these machines were what created the demand for a trike type bush machine. But I agree with you that dune buggies and subsequently atvs were the start of declining moose populations and that all happened in a very few short years.

  11. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by sawbill View Post
    T, I never believed tag allocation was ever revenue driven because the total revenue generated from moose license sales would barely keep the lights on for a year in most district offices. I do believe however the allocations had to do with pressure from lobbyists such as hunters organizations, tourist operators, etc who demanded more tag availability and then ran off to their local representative MP for support.
    Too, there was an era just prior to Atvs where VW dune buggies were everywhere and I often wonder if these machines were what created the demand for a trike type bush machine. But I agree with you that dune buggies and subsequently atvs were the start of declining moose populations and that all happened in a very few short years.
    Couple that with the many style of R.V's and numerous gadgets that allowed the hardy to lounge in slippers and house coats while eating their breaky, catching up on the news via satellite dish, before striking off into the wilderness in search of their quarry?
    Although care has been taken in preparing the information contained in the above post, the author does not and cannot guarantee its accuracy. All rights reserved.

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