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Thread: At the range testing out shooting positions .223

  1. #1
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    Default At the range testing out shooting positions .223

    Took on a few shooting positions yesterday at the range... Looking for some tips to tighten my groups...
    All shots were from 100yds...

    Best grouping is of course from the bench...
    Second best is from a chair sitting backwards using the backrest as an arm rest in conjunction with my shooting sticks
    then its a toss up between using a stadium seat + shooting sticks and a regular sitting position in a chair + shooting sticks...

    I read so much about individuals shooting coyotes out to 3-4 even 500 yds but man my percentage on a shot at 200yds is low, how do they do it....crosshairs move way too much for me... Thinking I might go to a 3x9 circle X type scope...currently using a 4x12 bushnell elite multi X ... Thoughts?

    Basically looking for or interested in hearing what you may use .......what works best for you in a hunting situation..... Truth be told, I miss way too many coyotes so..... looking for something that can keep me and the rifle a little more steady especially at the 200yd mark...



    And I took my time taking these shots.... coyote hunting doesn't allow for that luxury
    "Everything is easy when you know how"
    "Meat is not grown in stores"

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  3. #2
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    Try a bipod . Ever since I started using one I never looked back. I even use one when I go deer hunting. It's worth a try.

    Sent from my STH100-1 using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by OntHunter73 View Post
    Try a bipod . Ever since I started using one I never looked back. I even use one when I go deer hunting. It's worth a try.

    Sent from my STH100-1 using Tapatalk
    Like the ones screwed into the forearm...permanent style mount?
    "Everything is easy when you know how"
    "Meat is not grown in stores"

  5. #4
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    I use the ones that screw on were your sling would go. I have the 27" that tilt and swivel . Harris makes them.

    Sent from my STH100-1 using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by fratri View Post
    Like the ones screwed into the forearm...permanent style mount?
    X2 with the bi-pod. I have one on my Ruger M77SS .270Win with the scope zeroed at 200M. Be sure to get a bi-pod that swivels,so,you can set up quickly on uneven,frozen ground. There's a couple of different makes and sizes. It'll depend on how you want to set up a watch or blind or whether you just want to sit against any background with whatever camo you're using.

  7. #6
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    I don't think you will see much difference between a bipod and shooting sticks in hunting situations, that being said, I've only used a bipod and not shooting sticks. I use a Harris bipod - it's good quality, easy to attach to the rifle and I can get decent results target shooting, but I don't find it practical for the type of hunting I do. They come in certain height ranges, so one that is good for prone shooting is generally useless for shooting from a seated position.
    I also don't think switching from a multi-x reticle to a circle-x reticle will make any difference.
    Shooting from the prone position with some kind of rest (bipod or backpack) is a very stable position, but might not be practical when you are hunting coyotes in the middle of the winter. I doubt you will be lying in the snow facing exactly the right way when the coyote appears, and the coyote probably won't give you enough time to adjust to a prone position.
    Shooting beyond 200 yards is tough from the seated position unless you have something very solid to rest your rifle on. Last year I set up one of my portable deer hunting stands in a spot where 200 yard + shots were possible. It has a shooting rail at just the right height for those long shots. I tried stabilizing my rifle on it and I found that I was able to keep the cross-hairs very still. Unfortunately, the only opportunity I got for a shot involved a buck running at full speed after a doe, so I passed up the shot at that distance.
    I've heard good things about the Bog-pod (a tripod), but I've never used one myself.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rf2 View Post
    I don't think you will see much difference between a bipod and shooting sticks in hunting situations, that being said, I've only used a bipod and not shooting sticks. I use a Harris bipod - it's good quality, easy to attach to the rifle and I can get decent results target shooting, but I don't find it practical for the type of hunting I do. They come in certain height ranges, so one that is good for prone shooting is generally useless for shooting from a seated position.
    I also don't think switching from a multi-x reticle to a circle-x reticle will make any difference.
    Shooting from the prone position with some kind of rest (bipod or backpack) is a very stable position, but might not be practical when you are hunting coyotes in the middle of the winter. I doubt you will be lying in the snow facing exactly the right way when the coyote appears, and the coyote probably won't give you enough time to adjust to a prone position.
    Shooting beyond 200 yards is tough from the seated position unless you have something very solid to rest your rifle on. Last year I set up one of my portable deer hunting stands in a spot where 200 yard + shots were possible. It has a shooting rail at just the right height for those long shots. I tried stabilizing my rifle on it and I found that I was able to keep the cross-hairs very still. Unfortunately, the only opportunity I got for a shot involved a buck running at full speed after a doe, so I passed up the shot at that distance.
    I've heard good things about the Bog-pod (a tripod), but I've never used one myself.
    Thanks for sharing... Lots of good practical information there....
    I know there is no magic solution........ just looking to see what works for others....... as you said, hunting and shooting vary greatly.....Shooting from a bench is easy....
    those coyotes or any game for that matter can come from anywhere and usually you don't have much time to get on them and shoot.....
    So you don't think that circle x scope would help eh?
    I might pick one up anyway just to give it a try...
    "Everything is easy when you know how"
    "Meat is not grown in stores"

  9. #8
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    shooting sticks bog pod our the ones i use you can get a cradle for that brand so your firearms will sit in it

  10. #9
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    It's not been suggested, and I don't know if you have already done it.

    Try different brands and weights( 45, 52, 55 grain) to see if there is one that works better then the rest. If you reload or have a friend that does you can really dial in your rifle. Worst case is you get lots of range time and become a better shooter.
    Sic Gorgia Mus Allos Subjectatos Nunc.

  11. #10
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    Oops.

    Forgot to ask what your rifles trigger weight is? If it's too high, you can jerk the rifle when it breaks.
    Last edited by Snowwalker; August 1st, 2018 at 07:04 AM.
    Sic Gorgia Mus Allos Subjectatos Nunc.

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